Archive | December, 2012

Tags: ,

Best New Year’s Resolution Trips

Posted on 31 December 2012 by admin

At Fodor’s HQ, our writers’ and editors’ New Year’s resolutions are pretty travel heavy, setting our sights on trips like a sleek retreat in Utah’s backcountry or an eco-lodge in Costa Rica. But as much as we love a good globe-trot, we still manage to put a few of the usual self-improvement suspects on our lists too, like eat fewer croissants, read more, and build-up some core strength. In the spirit of starting 2013 off on the right foot, we thought we’d combine our travel and lifestyle resolutions to make sure we check every goal off our list. With this we give you: where travel meets mind, body, and soul—a good reminder that resolutions have no fixed address.

1-amangiri.jpg

Healthy + Splurge All-in-One

Where: Utah

The first Resolution trip will take you into Utah’s boonies to the 34-suite, 600-acre Amangiri resort. Hemmed in by Canyon Point’s desert-hued hills and plains, the resort is both incognito and stunning, fading into the landscape in a monochromatic style statement. Frequented by the likes of camera-shy A-listers for its remote location, architecture, and service (read: its cache requires advanced booking), Amangiri’s winter package promises a wellness tune-up with inclusions like daily guided hikes, yoga and pilates classes, and all meals. Bring warm clothes for crisp temperatures and nights spent by a roaring fire.

Hotel: Amangiri’s winter packages start at $1050/night and include airport transfers in addition to the package details mentioned above.

2-haciendaSanAgel.jpg

Hide and Seek

Where: Puerto Vallarta, Mexico

Some people go to rest and reflect at a cozy cabin in the woods, but why not trade snow for sun for your 2013 hideout? Just up the street from Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton’s former residences, peeking over Puerto Vallarta’s 40-mile coastline, there’s a petite and chic hacienda�€”nondescript from the outside and seductive on the inside—that beckons reflection and relaxation. Brimming with antique furniture, trickling fountains and blue lagoon-like pools, the collection of villas at Hacienda San Angel are intertwined by tropical courtyards and lush gardens. Perched above this historic town’s clay rooftops and church steeples, the views coupled with the hotel’s serenity invite reflection. 

Hotel: Hacienda San Angel From $3Ȓ/night.

3-RemotaChile.jpg

Get in Shape, Naturally

Where: Patagonia, Chile

Fading into the contours of a far-flung fishing village at the Southern tip of South America, Remota is a study in maximum architecture and minimum output. The grass-covered getaway feels more gallery than hotel as natural art streams through the window-covered exterior, and daily outdoor excursions give guests the opportunity to get up close and personal with the views—whether it be through leisurely strolls or heart-pumping hikes. When the daylight is done, the hotel’s sleek steam, sauna, and pool will soothe well-oiled muscles. Farm-to-table food and Chilean cheers follow.

Hotel: Remota from $1250/night includes airport transfer, meals, and self-guided local adventures.

4-HarmonyHotel.jpg

Surfing Eco-Retreat

Where: Nosara, Costa Rica

Go double-duty on your resolutions, ticking both the ‘get active’ and the ‘go eco-friendly’ boxes at Costa Rica’s sustainable surf getaway on the country’s Northern tip. Purchased by two American travelers who met surfing the breaks at Playa Guiones, the 24-room Harmony Hotel pays homage to its 1970s surf roots splashing a hint of the Brazilian modern aesthetic for an old-school-chic throwback. The eco-hotel posts an impressive list of sustainable, day-to-day practices making allowances for a farm that grows organic fare for the hotel’s restaurant and juice bar, solar panels to heat hot water for guestrooms, and partial use of wastewater to nourish the garden foliage, providing the perfect opportunity to turn over a new leaf in your 2013 travel. 

Hotel: Harmony Hotel, from $250/night.

5-parkerps-swim.jpg

Me Time

Where: Palm Springs, California 

When Jack Frost’s frigid temperament sends winter into a deep freeze, visions of blinding sun and a minty mojito (with an umbrella, of course) served poolside dance in our head. In a flash, we turn on our vacation auto-pilot and defer to a favored sun-soaked destination for solace. We recommend a mod weekend in Palm Springs. The desert haven is enjoying a renaissance among chic Angelenos, and even draws visitors from further afield with slick hotels, fun pool scenes, blessed out spas, and fantastic food. It’s the perfect respite to kick start a year of living well. Breakfast at Norma’s at the Parker Palm Springs and a lunch of healthy sandwiches and salads from Jake’s should be followed by a classic desert dinner at Tropicale. It’s a throwback to Palm Springs in the 70s.

Hotel: We’re partial to two hotels out here—The Ace Hotel for a laidback atmosphere, great pool scene, and fantastic cocktails; and the Parker Palm Springs for chic décor, the best breakfast around, and one of our all-time favorite spas.

Photo credits: Amangiri courtesy of Aman Resorts; Hacienda San Angel courtesy of Trish Friesen; Remota Chile courtesy of Remota; Harmony Hotel courtesy of Harmony Hotel; Parker Palm Springs courtesy of Parker Palm Springs

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/fodors/travel-news/~3/wigyj-Kx6xc/best-new-years-resolution-trips-6264.html

Comments (0)

Tags: ,

Best New Year’s Resolution Trips

Posted on 31 December 2012 by admin

At Fodor’s HQ, our writers’ and editors’ New Year’s resolutions are pretty travel heavy, setting our sights on trips like a sleek retreat in Utah’s backcountry or an eco-lodge in Costa Rica. But as much as we love a good globe-trot, we still manage to put a few of the usual self-improvement suspects on our lists too, like eat fewer croissants, read more, and build-up some core strength. In the spirit of starting 2013 off on the right foot, we thought we’d combine our travel and lifestyle resolutions to make sure we check every goal off our list. With this we give you: where travel meets mind, body, and soul—a good reminder that resolutions have no fixed address.

1-amangiri.jpg

Healthy + Splurge All-in-One

Where: Utah

The first Resolution trip will take you into Utah’s boonies to the 34-suite, 600-acre Amangiri resort. Hemmed in by Canyon Point’s desert-hued hills and plains, the resort is both incognito and stunning, fading into the landscape in a monochromatic style statement. Frequented by the likes of camera-shy A-listers for its remote location, architecture, and service (read: its cache requires advanced booking), Amangiri’s winter package promises a wellness tune-up with inclusions like daily guided hikes, yoga and pilates classes, and all meals. Bring warm clothes for crisp temperatures and nights spent by a roaring fire.

Hotel: Amangiri’s winter packages start at $1050/night and include airport transfers in addition to the package details mentioned above.

2-haciendaSanAgel.jpg

Hide and Seek

Where: Puerto Vallarta, Mexico

Some people go to rest and reflect at a cozy cabin in the woods, but why not trade snow for sun for your 2013 hideout? Just up the street from Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton’s former residences, peeking over Puerto Vallarta’s 40-mile coastline, there’s a petite and chic hacienda—nondescript from the outside and seductive on the inside—that beckons reflection and relaxation. Brimming with antique furniture, trickling fountains and blue lagoon-like pools, the collection of villas at Hacienda San Angel are intertwined by tropical courtyards and lush gardens. Perched above this historic town’s clay rooftops and church steeples, the views coupled with the hotel’s serenity invite reflection. 

Hotel: Hacienda San Angel From $350/night.

Get in Shape, Naturally

Where: Patagonia, Chile

Fading into the contours of a far-flung fishing village at the Southern tip of South America, Remota is a study in maximum architecture and minimum output. The grass-covered getaway feels more gallery than hotel as natural art streams through the window-covered exterior, and daily outdoor excursions give guests the opportunity to get up close and personal with the views—whether it be through leisurely strolls or heart-pumping hikes. When the daylight is done, the hotel’s sleek steam, sauna, and pool will soothe well-oiled muscles. Farm-to-table food and Chilean cheers follow.

Hotel: Remota from $쁢/night includes airport transfer, meals, and self-guided local adventures.

4-HarmonyHotel.jpg

Surfing Eco-Retreat

Where: Nosara, Costa Rica

Go double-duty on your resolutions, ticking both the ‘get active’ and the ‘go eco-friendly’ boxes at Costa Rica’s sustainable surf getaway on the country’s Northern tip. Purchased by two American travelers who met surfing the breaks at Playa Guiones, the 24-room Harmony Hotel pays homage to its 1970s surf roots splashing a hint of the Brazilian modern aesthetic for an old-school-chic throwback. The eco-hotel posts an impressive list of sustainable, day-to-day practices making allowances for a farm that grows organic fare for the hotel’s restaurant and juice bar, solar panels to heat hot water for guestrooms, and partial use of wastewater to nourish the garden foliage, providing the perfect opportunity to turn over a new leaf in your 2013 travel. 

Hotel: Harmony Hotel, from $250/night.

Me Time

Where: Palm Springs, California 

When Jack Frost’s frigid temperament sends winter into a deep freeze, visions of blinding sun and a minty mojito (with an umbrella, of course) served poolside dance in our head. In a flash, we turn on our vacation auto-pilot and defer to a favored sun-soaked destination for solace. We recommend a mod weekend in Palm Springs. The desert haven is enjoying a renaissance among chic Angelenos, and even draws visitors from further afield with slick hotels, fun pool scenes, blessed out spas, and fantastic food. It’s the perfect respite to kick start a year of living well. Breakfast at Norma’s at the Parker Palm Springs and a lunch of healthy sandwiches and salads from Jake’s should be followed by a classic desert dinner at Tropicale. It’s a throwback to Palm Springs in the 70s.

Hotel: We’re partial to two hotels out here—The Ace Hotel for a laidback atmosphere, great pool scene, and fantastic cocktails; and the Parker Palm Springs for chic décor, the best breakfast around, and one of our all-time favorite spas.

Photo credits: Amangiri courtesy of Aman Resorts; Hacienda San Angel courtesy of Trish Friesen; Remota Chile courtesy of Remota; Harmony Hotel courtesy of Harmony Hotel; Parker Palm Springs courtesy of Parker Palm Springs

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/fodors/travel-news/~3/wigyj-Kx6xc/best-new-years-resolution-trips-6264.html

Comments (0)

Tags: ,

Best New Year’s Resolution Trips

Posted on 31 December 2012 by admin

At Fodor’s HQ, our writers’ and editors’ New Year’s resolutions are pretty travel heavy, setting our sights on trips like a sleek retreat in Utah’s backcountry or an eco-lodge in Costa Rica. But as much as we love a good globe-trot, we still manage to put a few of the usual self-improvement suspects on our lists too, like eat fewer croissants, read more, and build-up some core strength. In the spirit of starting 2013 off on the right foot, we thought we’d combine our travel and lifestyle resolutions to make sure we check every goal off our list. With this we give you: where travel meets mind, body, and soul—a good reminder that resolutions have no fixed address.

1-amangiri.jpg

Healthy + Splurge All-in-One

Where: Utah

The first Resolution trip will take you into Utah’s boonies to the 34-suite, 600-acre Amangiri resort. Hemmed in by Canyon Point’s desert-hued hills and plains, the resort is both incognito and stunning, fading into the landscape in a monochromatic style statement. Frequented by the likes of camera-shy A-listers for its remote location, architecture, and service (read: its cache requires advanced booking), Amangiri’s winter package promises a wellness tune-up with inclusions like daily guided hikes, yoga and pilates classes, and all meals. Bring warm clothes for crisp temperatures and nights spent by a roaring fire.

Hotel: Amangiri’s winter packages start at $1050/night and include airport transfers in addition to the package details mentioned above.

2-haciendaSanAgel.jpg

Hide and Seek

Where: Puerto Vallarta, Mexico

Some people go to rest and reflect at a cozy cabin in the woods, but why not trade snow for sun for your 2013 hideout? Just up the street from Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton’s former residences, peeking over Puerto Vallarta’s 40-mile coastline, there’s a petite and chic hacienda—nondescript from the outside and seductive on the inside—that beckons reflection and relaxation. Brimming with antique furniture, trickling fountains and blue lagoon-like pools, the collection of villas at Hacienda San Angel are intertwined by tropical courtyards and lush gardens. Perched above this historic town’s clay rooftops and church steeples, the views coupled with the hotel’s serenity invite reflection. 

Hotel: Hacienda San Angel From $350/night.

3-RemotaChile.jpg

Get in Shape, Naturally

Where: Patagonia, Chile

Fading into the contours of a far-flung fishing village at the Southern tip of South America, Remota is a study in maximum architecture and minimum output. The grass-covered getaway feels more gallery than hotel as natural art streams through the window-covered exterior, and daily outdoor excursions give guests the opportunity to get up close and personal with the views—whether it be through leisurely strolls or heart-pumping hikes. When the daylight is done, the hotel’s sleek steam, sauna, and pool will soothe well-oiled muscles. Farm-to-table food and Chilean cheers follow.

Hotel: Remota from 񘌢/night includes airport transfer, meals, and self-guided local adventures.

4-HarmonyHotel.jpg

Surfing Eco-Retreat

Where: Nosara, Costa Rica

Go double-duty on your resolutions, ticking both the ‘get active’ and the ‘go eco-friendly’ boxes at Costa Rica’s sustainable surf getaway on the country’s Northern tip. Purchased by two American travelers who met surfing the breaks at Playa Guiones, the 24-room Harmony Hotel pays homage to its 1970s surf roots splashing a hint of the Brazilian modern aesthetic for an old-school-chic throwback. The eco-hotel posts an impressive list of sustainable, day-to-day practices making allowances for a farm that grows organic fare for the hotel’s restaurant and juice bar, solar panels to heat hot water for guestrooms, and partial use of wastewater to nourish the garden foliage, providing the perfect opportunity to turn over a new leaf in your 2013 travel. 

Hotel: Harmony Hotel, from $250/night.

Me Time

Where: Palm Springs, California 

When Jack Frost’s frigid temperament sends winter into a deep freeze, visions of blinding sun and a minty mojito (with an umbrella, of course) served poolside dance in our head. In a flash, we turn on our vacation auto-pilot and defer to a favored sun-soaked destination for solace. We recommend a mod weekend in Palm Springs. The desert haven is enjoying a renaissance among chic Angelenos, and even draws visitors from further afield with slick hotels, fun pool scenes, blessed out spas, and fantastic food. It’s the perfect respite to kick start a year of living well. Breakfast at Norma’s at the Parker Palm Springs and a lunch of healthy sandwiches and salads from Jake’s should be followed by a classic desert dinner at Tropicale. It’s a throwback to Palm Springs in the 70s.

Hotel: We’re partial to two hotels out here—The Ace Hotel for a laidback atmosphere, great pool scene, and fantastic cocktails and the Parker Palm Springs for chic décor, the best breakfast around, and one of our all-time favorite spas.

Photo credits: Amangiri courtesy of Aman Resorts; Hacienda San Angel courtesy of Trish Friesen; Remota Chile courtesy of Remota; Harmony Hotel courtesy of Harmony Hotel; Parker Palm Springs courtesy of Parker Palm Springs

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/fodors/travel-news/~3/wigyj-Kx6xc/best-new-years-resolution-trips-6264.html

Comments (0)

Tags: ,

Best New Year’s Resolution Trips

Posted on 31 December 2012 by admin

At Fodor’s HQ, our writers’ and editors’ New Year’s resolutions are pretty travel heavy, setting our sights on trips like a sleek retreat in Utah’s backcountry or an eco-lodge in Costa Rica. But as much as we love a good globe-trot, we still manage to put a few of the usual self-improvement suspects on our lists too, like eat fewer croissants, read more, and build-up some core strength. In the spirit of starting 2013 off on the right foot, we thought we’d combine our travel and lifestyle resolutions to make sure we check every goal off our list. With this we give you: where travel meets mind, body, and soul—a good reminder that resolutions have no fixed address.

1-amangiri.jpg

Healthy + Splurge All-in-One

Where: Utah

The first Resolution trip will take you into Utah’s boonies to the 34-suite, 600-acre Amangiri resort. Hemmed in by Canyon Point’s desert-hued hills and plains, the resort is both incognito and stunning, fading into the landscape in a monochromatic style statement. Frequented by the likes of camera-shy A-listers for its remote location, architecture, and service (read: its cache requires advanced booking), Amangiri’s winter package promises a wellness tune-up with inclusions like daily guided hikes, yoga and pilates classes, and all meals. Bring warm clothes for crisp temperatures and nights spent by a roaring fire.

Hotel: Amangiri’s winter packages start at $1050/night and include airport transfers in addition to the package details mentioned above.

2-haciendaSanAgel.jpg

Hide and Seek

Where: Puerto Vallarta, Mexico

Some people go to rest and reflect at a cozy cabin in the woods, but why not trade snow for sun for your 2013 hideout? Just up the street from Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton’s former residences, peeking over Puerto Vallarta’s 40-mile coastline, there’s a petite and chic hacienda—nondescript from the outside and seductive on the inside—that beckons reflection and relaxation. Brimming with antique furniture, trickling fountains and blue lagoon-like pools, the collection of villas at Hacienda San Angel are intertwined by tropical courtyards and lush gardens. Perched above this historic town’s clay rooftops and church steeples, the views coupled with the hotel’s serenity invite reflection. 

Hotel: Hacienda San Angel From $350/night.

Get in Shape, Naturally

Where: Patagonia, Chile

Fading into the contours of a far-flung fishing village at the Southern tip of South America, Remota is a study in maximum architecture and minimum output. The grass-covered getaway feels more gallery than hotel as natural art streams through the window-covered exterior, and daily outdoor excursions give guests the opportunity to get up close and personal with the views—whether it be through leisurely strolls or heart-pumping hikes. When the daylight is done, the hotel’s sleek steam, sauna, and pool will soothe well-oiled muscles. Farm-to-table food and Chilean cheers follow.

Hotel: Remota from $쁢/night includes airport transfer, meals, and self-guided local adventures.

4-HarmonyHotel.jpg

Surfing Eco-Retreat

Where: Nosara, Costa Rica

Go double-duty on your resolutions, ticking both the ‘get active’ and the ‘go eco-friendly’ boxes at Costa Rica’s sustainable surf getaway on the country’s Northern tip. Purchased by two American travelers who met surfing the breaks at Playa Guiones, the 24-room Harmony Hotel pays homage to its 1970s surf roots splashing a hint of the Brazilian modern aesthetic for an old-school-chic throwback. The eco-hotel posts an impressive list of sustainable, day-to-day practices making allowances for a farm that grows organic fare for the hotel’s restaurant and juice bar, solar panels to heat hot water for guestrooms, and partial use of wastewater to nourish the garden foliage, providing the perfect opportunity to turn over a new leaf in your 2013 travel. 

Hotel: Harmony Hotel, from $250/night.

Me Time

Where: Palm Springs, California 

When Jack Frost’s frigid temperament sends winter into a deep freeze, visions of blinding sun and a minty mojito (with an umbrella, of course) served poolside dance in our head. In a flash, we turn on our vacation auto-pilot and defer to a favored sun-soaked destination for solace. We recommend a mod weekend in Palm Springs. The desert haven is enjoying a renaissance among chic Angelenos, and even draws visitors from further afield with slick hotels, fun pool scenes, blessed out spas, and fantastic food. It’s the perfect respite to kick start a year of living well. Breakfast at Norma’s at the Parker Palm Springs and a lunch of healthy sandwiches and salads from Jake’s should be followed by a classic desert dinner at Tropicale. It’s a throwback to Palm Springs in the 70s.

Hotel: We’re partial to two hotels out here—The Ace Hotel for a laidback atmosphere, great pool scene, and fantastic cocktails; and the Parker Palm Springs for chic décor, the best breakfast around, and one of our all-time favorite spas.

Photo credits: Amangiri courtesy of Aman Resorts; Hacienda San Angel courtesy of Trish Friesen; Remota Chile courtesy of Remota; Harmony Hotel courtesy of Harmony Hotel; Parker Palm Springs courtesy of Parker Palm Springs

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/fodors/travel-news/~3/wigyj-Kx6xc/best-new-years-resolution-trips-6264.html

Comments (0)

Tags: ,

Just Back From: Wailea Wine and Food Festival

Posted on 31 December 2012 by admin

My memories of Maui consisted largely of water slides and kid pools, so when I was invited to the first annual Wailea Wine and Food Festival, I jumped at the opportunity to create new memories…with wine. We got in a few days early to afford some time spent snorkeling on Kapalua Bay, driving the Road to Hana, and scouting out delicious eats on Maui beyond the strip of resorts in Wailea. We were not disappointed, and in fact found an unforgettable meal of pad thai, Vietnamese crepes, garlic noodles, hapa ramen, and Filipino “bacon and eggs,” which consisted of crispy pork belly, poached egg, tomato, and onion in a garlicky broth, at Star Noodle.

bacon-and-eggs-stephanie-hua.jpg

Onto the festival. We spent the first night at a cocktail party under the stars at the Fairmont Kea Lani. It was a little preview of who we’d be spending the next few days eating and drinking with—winemakers from California and beyond, master sommeliers, chefs from resorts along Wailea, and Hawaii locals from as nearby as Lahaina and as far as Oahu.

We started the next day with a 10:30am wine tasting session. As you do. The first of the festival’s “Wine Encounters,” Pinot Passion, covered seven wineries’ bottles of pinot, followed by What’s New, Next Trendy in California Wine (my personal favorite of the weekend), which brought master sommeliers together with a motley crew of California vintners who talked to new trends in California wine as well as old or risky varietals being given new life.

The tasting felt very Californian—laidback and excited at the same time. We tasted a vermintino that came from a lover’s spat—the husband and wife team behind Ryme Cellars disagreed on how to grow vermentino, so they made “his” and “hers” versions. Soon after, we tasted a rousanne that was a 180 case experiment. But the clear favorite was the charbono from Shypoke. A lesser-known grape, grown almost exclusively in California (as well as Savoie and Argentina), it was rich and fantastic, and frankly undersold by the winemaker who touched on how hard it is to grow and market the temperamental grape. He gave a too-stern disclaimer, saying “it’s probably not going to be your favorite; there are three kinds of people: those who hate it, those who haven’t heard of it, and then some who love it.” I loved it.

That night was spent next to Peter Merriman, considered the founding father of “Hawaii regional cuisine” at his Monkeypod Kitchen. He made three kinds of ceviche at the table, each of which was more bright and fresh than the last. The dinner that followed was made entirely from Maui-sourced ingredients. As we ate, he told us stories of his friend who farmed this and his other friend that caught that in the ocean earlier in the day.

Italy-wine-tasting.jpg

Strolling into the Four Seasons Wailea the next morning, we had all Italian wines to look forward to. The morning’s Escape to Italy in Eight Glasses tasting was led by Shelley Lindgren, of San Francisco’s A16 restaurant. A sparkling brut was quickly followed by a Sicilian white and a soft, mineral-y sauvignon blanc. But the reds were truly stellar, particularly Marchesi di Gresy’s barbaresco; it was the only glass that was drained at every table.

In its first year, the festival made good use of the shortlist of luxury resorts that sit next to each other along Wailea—the Fairmont Kea Lani, the Grand Wailea (which hosted a wine and food tasting by tiki lamps one evening), and the Four Seasons Wailea. One might wish that as the festival grows, they’d branch out, showcasing the fantastic scenery and foods you can clearly find all over the island. But waking up to sun, sand, and wine tasting is really not a bad way to spend a few days.

I’ll divulge more on our full Maui itinerary as well as some solid tips on driving the Hana Highway soon, so stay tuned.

Photo Credits: Wailea Resort, Pad Thai, and Bacon and Eggs Courtesy Stephanie Hua; Italy Wine Tasting Courtesy Nicole Campoy

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/fodors/travel-news/~3/yLUiCZJ8iTY/just-back-from-wailea-wine-and-food-festival-6301.html

Comments (0)

Tags: ,

Just Back From: Wailea Wine and Food Festival

Posted on 31 December 2012 by admin

My memories of Maui consisted largely of water slides and kid pools, so when I was invited to the first annual Wailea Wine and Food Festival, I jumped at the opportunity to create new memories…with wine. We got in a few days early to afford some time spent snorkeling on Kapalua Bay, driving the Road to Hana, and scouting out delicious eats on Maui beyond the strip of resorts in Wailea. We were not disappointed, and in fact found an unforgettable meal of pad thai, Vietnamese crepes, garlic noodles, hapa ramen, and Filipino “bacon and eggs,” which consisted of crispy pork belly, poached egg, tomato, and onion in a garlicky broth, at Star Noodle.

bacon-and-eggs-stephanie-hua.jpg

Onto the festival. We spent the first night at a cocktail party under the stars at the Fairmont Kea Lani. It was a little preview of who we’d be spending the next few days eating and drinking with—winemakers from California and beyond, master sommeliers, chefs from resorts along Wailea, and Hawaii locals from as nearby as Lahaina and as far as Oahu.

We started the next day with a 10:30am wine tasting session. As you do. The first of the festival’s “Wine Encounters,” Pinot Passion, covered seven wineries’ bottles of pinot, followed by What’s New, Next Trendy in California Wine (my personal favorite of the weekend), which brought master sommeliers together with a motley crew of California vintners who talked to new trends in California wine as well as old or risky varietals being given new life.

The tasting felt very Californian—laidback and excited at the same time. We tasted a vermintino that came from a lover’s spat—the husband and wife team behind Ryme Cellars disagreed on how to grow vermentino, so they made “his” and “hers” versions. Soon after, we tasted a rousanne that was a 180 case experiment. But the clear favorite was the charbono from Shypoke. A lesser-known grape, grown almost exclusively in California (as well as Savoie and Argentina), it was rich and fantastic, and frankly undersold by the winemaker who touched on how hard it is to grow and market the temperamental grape. He gave a too-stern disclaimer, saying “it’s probably not going to be your favorite; there are three kinds of people: those who hate it, those who haven’t heard of it, and then some who love it.” I loved it.

That night was spent next to Peter Merriman, considered the founding father of “Hawaii regional cuisine” at his Monkeypod Kitchen. He made three kinds of ceviche at the table, each of which was more bright and fresh than the last. The dinner that followed was made entirely from Maui-sourced ingredients. As we ate, he told us stories of his friend who farmed this and his other friend that caught that in the ocean earlier in the day.

Italy-wine-tasting.jpg

Strolling into the Four Seasons Wailea the next morning, we had all Italian wines to look forward to. The morning’s Escape to Italy in Eight Glasses tasting was led by Shelley Lindgren, of San Francisco’s A16 restaurant. A sparkling brut was quickly followed by a Sicilian white and a soft, mineral-y sauvignon blanc. But the reds were truly stellar, particularly Marchesi di Gresy’s barbaresco; it was the only glass that was drained at every table.

In its first year, the festival made good use of the shortlist of luxury resorts that sit next to each other along Wailea—the Fairmont Kea Lani, the Grand Wailea (which hosted a wine and food tasting by tiki lamps one evening), and the Four Seasons Wailea. One might wish that as the festival grows, they’d branch out, showcasing the fantastic scenery and foods you can clearly find all over the island. But waking up to sun, sand, and wine tasting is really not a bad way to spend a few days.

I’ll divulge more on our full Maui itinerary as well as some solid tips on driving the Hana Highway soon, so stay tuned.

Photo Credits: Wailea Resort, Pad Thai, and Bacon and Eggs Courtesy Stephanie Hua; Italy Wine Tasting Courtesy Nicole Campoy

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/fodors/travel-news/~3/yLUiCZJ8iTY/just-back-from-wailea-wine-and-food-festival-6301.html

Comments (0)

Tags: ,

Just Back From: Wailea Wine and Food Festival

Posted on 31 December 2012 by admin

My memories of Maui consisted largely of water slides and kid pools, so when I was invited to the first annual Wailea Wine and Food Festival, I jumped at the opportunity to create new memories…with wine. We got in a few days early to afford some time spent snorkeling on Kapalua Bay, driving the Road to Hana, and scouting out delicious eats on Maui beyond the strip of resorts in Wailea. We were not disappointed, and in fact found an unforgettable meal of pad thai, Vietnamese crepes, garlic noodles, hapa ramen, and Filipino “bacon and eggs,” which consisted of crispy pork belly, poached egg, tomato, and onion in a garlicky broth, at Star Noodle.

bacon-and-eggs-stephanie-hua.jpg

Onto the festival. We spent the first night at a cocktail party under the stars at the Fairmont Kea Lani. It was a little preview of who we’d be spending the next few days eating and drinking with—winemakers from California and beyond, master sommeliers, chefs from resorts along Wailea, and Hawaii locals from as nearby as Lahaina and as far as Oahu.

We started the next day with a 10:30am wine tasting session. As you do. The first of the festival’s “Wine Encounters,” Pinot Passion, covered seven wineries’ bottles of pinot, followed by What’s New, Next Trendy in California Wine (my personal favorite of the weekend), which brought master sommeliers together with a motley crew of California vintners who talked to new trends in California wine as well as old or risky varietals being given new life.

The tasting felt very Californian—laidback and excited at the same time. We tasted a vermintino that came from a lover’s spat—the husband and wife team behind Ryme Cellars disagreed on how to grow vermentino, so they made “his” and “hers” versions. Soon after, we tasted a rousanne that was a 180 case experiment. But the clear favorite was the charbono from Shypoke. A lesser-known grape, grown almost exclusively in California (as well as Savoie and Argentina), it was rich and fantastic, and frankly undersold by the winemaker who touched on how hard it is to grow and market the temperamental grape. He gave a too-stern disclaimer, saying “it’s probably not going to be your favorite; there are three kinds of people: those who hate it, those who haven’t heard of it, and then some who love it.” I loved it.

That night was spent next to Peter Merriman, considered the founding father of “Hawaii regional cuisine” at his Monkeypod Kitchen. He made three kinds of ceviche at the table, each of which was more bright and fresh than the last. The dinner that followed was made entirely from Maui-sourced ingredients. As we ate, he told us stories of his friend who farmed this and his other friend that caught that in the ocean earlier in the day.

Italy-wine-tasting.jpg

Strolling into the Four Seasons Wailea the next morning, we had all Italian wines to look forward to. The morning’s Escape to Italy in Eight Glasses tasting was led by Shelley Lindgren, of San Francisco’s A16 restaurant. A sparkling brut was quickly followed by a Sicilian white and a soft, mineral-y sauvignon blanc. But the reds were truly stellar, particularly Marchesi di Gresy’s barbaresco; it was the only glass that was drained at every table.

In its first year, the festival made good use of the shortlist of luxury resorts that sit next to each other along Wailea—the Fairmont Kea Lani, the Grand Wailea (which hosted a wine and food tasting by tiki lamps one evening), and the Four Seasons Wailea. One might wish that as the festival grows, they’d branch out, showcasing the fantastic scenery and foods you can clearly find all over the island. But waking up to sun, sand, and wine tasting is really not a bad way to spend a few days.

I’ll divulge more on our full Maui itinerary as well as some solid tips on driving the Hana Highway soon, so stay tuned.

Photo Credits: Wailea Resort, Pad Thai, and Bacon and Eggs Courtesy Stephanie Hua; Italy Wine Tasting Courtesy Nicole Campoy

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/fodors/travel-news/~3/yLUiCZJ8iTY/just-back-from-wailea-wine-and-food-festival-6301.html

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Just Back From: Wailea Wine and Food Festival

Posted on 31 December 2012 by admin

My memories of Maui consisted largely of water slides and kid pools, so when I was invited to the first annual Wailea Wine and Food Festival, I jumped at the opportunity to create new memories…with wine. We got in a few days early to afford some time spent snorkeling on Kapalua Bay, driving the Road to Hana, and scouting out delicious eats on Maui beyond the strip of resorts in Wailea. We were not disappointed, and in fact found an unforgettable meal of pad thai, Vietnamese crepes, garlic noodles, hapa ramen, and Filipino “bacon and eggs,” which consisted of crispy pork belly, poached egg, tomato, and onion in a garlicky broth, at Star Noodle.

bacon-and-eggs-stephanie-hua.jpg

Onto the festival. We spent the first night at a cocktail party under the stars at the Fairmont Kea Lani. It was a little preview of who we’d be spending the next few days eating and drinking with—winemakers from California and beyond, master sommeliers, chefs from resorts along Wailea, and Hawaii locals from as nearby as Lahaina and as far as Oahu.

We started the next day with a 10:30am wine tasting session. As you do. The first of the festival’s “Wine Encounters,” Pinot Passion, covered seven wineries’ bottles of pinot, followed by What’s New, Next Trendy in California Wine (my personal favorite of the weekend), which brought master sommeliers together with a motley crew of California vintners who talked to new trends in California wine as well as old or risky varietals being given new life.

The tasting felt very Californian—laidback and excited at the same time. We tasted a vermintino that came from a lover’s spat—the husband and wife team behind Ryme Cellars disagreed on how to grow vermentino, so they made “his” and “hers” versions. Soon after, we tasted a rousanne that was a 180 case experiment. But the clear favorite was the charbono from Shypoke. A lesser-known grape, grown almost exclusively in California (as well as Savoie and Argentina), it was rich and fantastic, and frankly undersold by the winemaker who touched on how hard it is to grow and market the temperamental grape. He gave a too-stern disclaimer, saying “it’s probably not going to be your favorite; there are three kinds of people: those who hate it, those who haven’t heard of it, and then some who love it.” I loved it.

That night was spent next to Peter Merriman, considered the founding father of “Hawaii regional cuisine” at his Monkeypod Kitchen. He made three kinds of ceviche at the table, each of which was more bright and fresh than the last. The dinner that followed was made entirely from Maui-sourced ingredients. As we ate, he told us stories of his friend who farmed this and his other friend that caught that in the ocean earlier in the day.

Italy-wine-tasting.jpg

Strolling into the Four Seasons Wailea the next morning, we had all Italian wines to look forward to. The morning’s Escape to Italy in Eight Glasses tasting was led by Shelley Lindgren, of San Francisco’s A16 restaurant. A sparkling brut was quickly followed by a Sicilian white and a soft, mineral-y sauvignon blanc. But the reds were truly stellar, particularly Marchesi di Gresy’s barbaresco; it was the only glass that was drained at every table.

In its first year, the festival made good use of the shortlist of luxury resorts that sit next to each other along Wailea—the Fairmont Kea Lani, the Grand Wailea (which hosted a wine and food tasting by tiki lamps one evening), and the Four Seasons Wailea. One might wish that as the festival grows, they’d branch out, showcasing the fantastic scenery and foods you can clearly find all over the island. But waking up to sun, sand, and wine tasting is really not a bad way to spend a few days.

I’ll divulge more on our full Maui itinerary as well as some solid tips on driving the Hana Highway soon, so stay tuned.

Photo Credits: Wailea Resort, Pad Thai, and Bacon and Eggs Courtesy Stephanie Hua; Italy Wine Tasting Courtesy Nicole Campoy

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/fodors/travel-news/~3/yLUiCZJ8iTY/just-back-from-wailea-wine-and-food-festival-6301.html

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Learn to Say Cheers in 7 Languages (VIDEO)

Posted on 31 December 2012 by admin

Our friends over at Living Language put together a very festive video teaching all of us to say “Cheers” in seven different languages just in time to ring in the New Year. So grab a glass of something bubbly and practice your accent to get it just right. Whichever language(s) you choose to shout at midnight—French, German, Spanish, Chinese, Arabic, Italian, or Japanese—we want to wish you a very happy and fantastic New Year!

What’s left to say, besides Salute!?

Photo credit: Champagne glasses via Shutterstock

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/fodors/travel-news/~3/ic16SE_rIcQ/learn-to-say-cheers-in-7-languages-6274.html

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Learn to Say Cheers in 7 Languages (VIDEO)

Posted on 31 December 2012 by admin

Our friends over at Living Language put together a very festive video teaching all of us to say “Cheers” in seven different languages just in time to ring in the New Year. So grab a glass of something bubbly and practice your accent to get it just right. Whichever language(s) you choose to shout at midnight—French, German, Spanish, Chinese, Arabic, Italian, or Japanese—we want to wish you a very happy and fantastic New Year!

What’s left to say, besides Salute!?

Photo credit: Champagne glasses via Shutterstock

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/fodors/travel-news/~3/ic16SE_rIcQ/learn-to-say-cheers-in-7-languages-6274.html

Comments (0)

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