Archive | October, 2013

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Fodor’s Approved: 10 Best Carry-On Bags for 2013

Posted on 31 October 2013 by admin

We’ve tested carry-ons, checked bags, summer weekenders, and beauty products all for our beloved Fodor’s Approved series. But we’re still on the hunt for the best stuff to bring on the road. And you can’t get any of that stuff anywhere without a great bag. So we went out and found a fresh crop of stellar carry-on bags to test for 2013. We searched high and low for bags at all price points, styles, colors, and makes from cool and casual duffels to swanky, high-tech wheelies. There’s bound to be a bag in this list for nearly every kind of traveler.

Each bag that we recommend below has been road-tested by our own editorial staff. These bags came with us on the NYC subway, on planes and trains, to Mexico, Italy, Canada, and more. They went on road trips and week-long getaways. And the editors came back with lots to say about each of them. Without further ado, the carry-on bags class of 2013.

WTW-carry-on-bags-2013-01.jpg

1. Lands’ End Lighthouse 20″ Hybrid Upright Bag (Deep Sea Navy)

The Tester: Arabella Bowen, Editor-in-Chief

Where did you go? Cramped office elevators; the NYC subway; three airports (JFK, ZUR, VCE); Venice, Italy.

The Review: This bag has it all ($248): Four smooth spinner wheels; a roomy interior (with the option to expand); lightweight materials perfect for navigating Venice (or anywhere) and a compact size that slid easily into overhead bins. It fit everything I needed it to, and more. And I loved the color���it’s a smart little number. Plus the hardback exterior protected the bottle of Campari I lugged home.

The Catch: One thing this bag needs? Brakes for the wheels! I let go of it on the subway and it rolled away from me!

The Verdict: I would absolutely buy this bag for myself. It offers amazing value for $248 and a lightweight style that won’t slow you down.

2. Hideo Wakamatsu Flash Carry-On 20″ (Gold)

The Tester: Erica Duecy, Deputy Editor, Fodors.com

Where did you go? Boston, on the train, for a 3-day work trip.

The Review: This is an exceptionally light, well-styled wheelie ($209). The hard outer shell is surprisingly flexible. The interior spaces are smartly designed: there is space to strap in a computer and office items in the front section (perfect for when you’re traveling with a computer and files, like I was) and plenty of room for a long weekend’s worth of clothing. The Gold color sounds flashy, but its matte and really cool looking for men and women.

The Catch: There was only one drawback: no skid pads on the back to prevent scratches when pulling it up stairs or onto curbs.

The Verdict: I would definitely buy this bag (er, can I keep it?!).

3. Muji Bellow Pocket 4 Wheel Carry in Medium (Black)

The Tester: Linda Cabasin, Editorial Director

Where did you go? Two mile-long walks in NYC; a weekend in the Adirondacks.

The Review: I loved how the bag was super light (贵.50) even when stashed with a weekend’s worth of outdoor gear and my iPad. Since the case has four wheels, it’s great to have an easy-to-use wheel lock to avoid runaway bag syndrome. There are plenty of pockets in the outside section as well as a nice big one inside. Tidy packers (or aspiring ones like me) will appreciate the nylon panel you can fold over your gear before you strap it in.

The Catch: Oddly, the handle wasn’t long enough for me (5 feet, 9 inches)!

The Verdict: All of the bags qualities would make me want to buy (and definitely recommend) this bag, but because of the handle length, I wouldn’t be able to buy it for myself.

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4. Briggs and Riley Torq International Carry-On Spinner (Red)

The Tester: Douglas Stallings, Senior Editor

Where did you go? Flight to Miami, short cruise on Disney Magic

The Review: All the various packing sections in this bag ($479) are phenomenal. It comes with a combination lock that clips the zippers to the bag, which is surprisingly useful. There’s a protected outside section perfect for a laptop and I loved the polycarbonate shell—it didn’t show a single scratch! Plus it holds a tremendous amount of stuff. I’ve always been skeptical about 4-wheeled bags, but I enjoyed being able to push the bag through the airport.

The Catch: The bag was fairly heavy when empty. And while it certainly meets all airline carry-on requirements, it’s not small. The crew asked if I would check it on my return flight.

The Verdict: This isn’t the bag for everyone, considering its weight, but if you’re willing to spend $479 for a sturdy and sleek carry-on, definitely consider this one.

5. REI Wheely Beast Wheeled Duffel 21″ (Castlerock)

The Tester: Margaret Kelly, Senior Editor, Special Projects

The Review: Right off the bat, this bag ($149) is best suited to sporty or outdoor adventures. Not just because of the look, but because of useful features like extra-large wheels making it easy to roll over more treacherous patches of ground and padded duffel handles that made it easy to carry even when full. Plus, the interior is cavernous and the top flap gives easy access for packing it up. The fabric seems totally durable as well—I didn’t take it out into inclement weather, but I’d guess it could handle it.

The Catch: You wouldn’t take this bag on a weekend trip to Paris or something. It’s made for, and is best suited for, outdoorsy pursuits.

The Verdict: Someone sportier than I should definitely buy this bag. It was super easy to maneuver when full and has a great, durable feel.

6. Fjallraven Duffel No. 4 Large (Green)

The Tester: Linda Cabasin, Editorial Director

Where did you go? Overnight road trip to the Brandywine Valley in Pennsylvania

The Review: Ok, listen. Most duffels frustrate me because they’re either too small, too heavy when packed, or so big they flop around. This one totally won me over, though ($175). Fjallraven is a Swedish company that makes serious hiking gear and clothes, so they are not messing around. This bag is trim but substantial, I liked the outdoorsy look and the feel of the waxed, water-resistant fabric. The sturdy leather handles and protective zipper flat were great touches. Plus, the company’s leather arctic fox symbol is downright cute.

The Catch: I guess I may not have chosen green, but it comes in 4 colors, so…

The Verdict: I would definitely buy this, although I’d have to share with my husband who was eyeing it.

7. Billykirk No. 165 Black Waxed Carryall (Black)

The Tester: Nicole Campoy, Blog Editor

Where did you go? Palm Springs and Los Cabos, but full disclosure, I also had a wheely carry-on. It was two weeks!

The Review: It has a hip, doctors-bag look ($325) with leather straps that close with belt buckles and two strap lengths for carrying it on your arm or your shoulder. The fabric is sturdy and makes you feel like you can’t ruin it, no matter the wear and tear. The interior has 2 useful small pockets for lip balm, phone, passport, etc, and the main pocket easily fit my Macbook Air, magazines, and a pair of shoes.

The Catch: The bag is heavy even when empty, so it’s best used alongside another carry-on. I would not use this on its own if I had to lug it through the airport.

The Verdict: I would buy it as a bigger-than-my-purse addition to my wheely.

WTW-carry-on-bags-2013-03.jpg

8. Alternative Apparel Hogan Duffel (Black)

The Tester: Amanda Oppold, Editorial Intern

The Review: I liked the size and sleek design of this duffel ($56) a lot with its gray stitching and cool leather accents. It has outer pockets that are useful for storing things you’ll need to grab in a hurry on the go. It’s easy to carry around and fit a ton of stuff. At the same time, it is not so big that you’re overwhelmed by it, even when full. It’s easy to pack, but is best suited to organized packers because of its few interior pockets.

The Catch: I could have used a few more interior pockets. And once I’d really filled it to the brim, I was slightly worried that the long shoulder strap would snap. It didn’t, but I thought about it.

The Verdict: At this price point, I’d buy it to use in combination with a wheeled carry-on, for road trips, or for more day-to-day uses. I just worry about packing it to the brim.

9. Lipault 2-Wheeled 20″ Satchel (Purple)

The Tester: Caroline Trefler, Senior Editor, Cities and Cultural Destinations

Where did you go? Toronto for a long weekend

The Review: My weekend included casual daytime plans, a dressed-up party, and running, meaning several pairs of shoes and outfits (more than the average weekend). This bag ($179) really fit everything I needed easily and was still light to carry, whether I was rolling it or holding it as a satchel. I loved the color and felt stylish rolling it through the airport.

The Catch: The zipper can be hard to open and close because it sort of folds inward in a weird way.

The Verdict: The zipper thing bugged me, but otherwise I loved this bag.

10. Baggu Knapsack (Yellow)

The Tester: Róisín Cameron, Associate Editor, Countryside and Adventure

The Review: For a backpack ($64), it’s surprisingly spacious and comfortable to carry with the padded straps, plus I liked the bright color and the hip style of it. It looks very Scandinavian. It might be tough to use for more than a night away, but for a more relaxed or rugged trip it is perfect. I actually think this is the bag you buy to carry through the airport alongside a bigger bag that you’ve checked. Or it’s the bag you give to your kids to carry their in-flight entertainment.

The Catch: As I said, it would be tough to travel for long with this bag. And the fact that it shuts with just a drawstring and Velcro gave me pause if I were to use it on a foreign public transportation system, for example.

The Verdict: I would definitely buy it as a good multi-tasker bag for short trips or a hike or something, but not as a stand-alone carry-on.  

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FAA Allows for Electronics Use During Entire Flight

Posted on 31 October 2013 by admin

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Turning off your electronic devices in-flight is about to become a thing of the past. The FAA has formally accepted the recommendations previously submitted to allow the use of personal electronic devices (PEDs) from gate to gate rather than only while at cruising altitude. This does not mean that all devices are permitted on all airlines or aircraft immediately but it does lay the framework for airlines to quickly reach that point. Both Delta Airlines and JetBlue Airways have already submitted paperwork to the FAA and are expecting approval very quickly.

The new rules will allow smaller devices—phones, eReaders, and tabletsâ��during all phases of flight other than the actual take-off and landing events. Larger items such as laptops will still need to be stored throughout the taxi period. In-flight internet connectivity and media streaming will also be permitted throughout the flight, assuming the airline provides such services. In-flight connectivity provider Gogo has indicated that its services are not optimized to work below 10,000 feet so flights with that service, including those operated by Delta, US Airways, American Airlines, Alaska Airlines, and Virgin America will likely not have internet connectivity throughout the flight. Southwest and United Airlines use satellite-based systems which can work in the air and on the ground; JetBlue is also deploying a satellite-based system starting later this year. As always the final details on the implementation of these guidelines will come down to individual airline policy. These policies must be filed with the FAA and approved but the specific rules are set by the airlines within the guidelines the FAA has released.

In a statement Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx noted the inevitability of this change and spoke to the value it will bring to passengers, “We believe today’s decision honors both our commitment to safety and consumer’s increasing desire to use their electronic devices during all phases of their flights. These guidelines reflect input from passengers, pilots, manufacturers, and flight attendants, and I look forward to seeing airlines implement these much anticipated guidelines in the near future.”

Voice calls via cellular service are still prohibited in flight. This rule is set by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), not the FAA. While the recommendations to the FAA suggest that they work with the FCC to review that policy there are no immediate changes expected.

Photo credit: Boy with iPad via Dreamstime.com

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Beer-Lover’s Guide to San Diego

Posted on 31 October 2013 by admin

When you think of traveling to California in the name of swilling delicious, adult beverages, you probably think of wine country. But there’s another player down south that’s well worth a second look. San Diego is California’s beer country. The array of beers brewed in this city by the bay is unparalleled (some 72 craft breweries exist in the county alone) with sophisticated and dainty next to punchy and robust. And there is no better time to discover it, hops and all, starting this weekend during San Diego Beer Week.

Start at Beerlandia

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San Diego beer doesn’t have a welcome center per se, but the Brew Project is so close to the airport we can’t help drawing a comparison. Plus, they hand out pocket-sized directional cards to area breweries, so you can visit them. But before you go… there are 31 local beers here. The 9,000 square-foot warehouse space shares a roof with wine bar 57 Degrees. Seasonal favorites are Hess’s Magna Cucurbita, a pumpkin stout with cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg aromas; and Societe Brewing Company’s The Butcher, a Russian Imperial Stout with roasted malt, bittersweet chocolate, espresso bean, and wet earth notes.

Get Educated

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Get an interactive education in the San Diego beer scene from the past to present at the Balboa Park’s History Center has a new exhibit worshipping it: Bottle Kegged: San Diego’s Craft Beer Culture (through January 20, 2014). Docents are from Quaff, a local home-brewers club that nurtures an incredible pool of beer talent. You’ll quickly discover that San Diego is known for its IPAs. One to try is Alpine Beer Co.’s Nelson, brewed with New Zealand hops.

Tour the Tasting Rooms

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The easiest way to navigate the breweries spread across town is to hire Brew Hop. Love stouts? Owner Summer Nixon or one of her beer-obsessed guides will tailor an itinerary around them, and drive you around in one of their vehicles, which are licensed for open bottles. Rates vary depending on the number of people in your party and how many hours you choose to tour. Roughly, it’s $95 per person for 2.5 hours, for up to 5 people (rates go down for more people). In the witching season, Nixon likes AleSmith‘s Evil Dead Red, a hoppy red ale with 6.66% alcohol.

Get Some Beer-tainment

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Don’t miss a chance to see Stone Brewery’s newest location in Liberty Station, an old Naval Base Training Station. It is spread over 23,000 square feet in the former circa 1900s mess hall. Gardens, bocce ball, and movie nights are all on tap in addition to very popular local brews.

Walk the Urban Beer Trail

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Along the main artery of 30th Street in San Diego’s historic North Park neighborhood is a glut of beer stops. Start at Ritual Tavern, where you’ll find Lightening Brewery’s Thunderweizen and Elemental Pilsner, both brewed in accordance with the Reinheitsgebot (Bavarian Beer Purity Law of 1516) on tap in the ‘-ember’ months. A couple doors down, Toronado dispenses a wide selection of local beers with good mac n cheese. Nearby, Hess Brewing, the neighborhood’s new—and sole—brewery is in a former bible store. Well-regarded brewer Mike Hess has tanks, a tasting room, and a patio to enjoy an evangelism of a different variety. Grab a night cap with a beer cocktail at the retro-pharmacy-décor of Polite Provisions. The Dublin Iced Coffee is made with AleSmith’s Speedway Stout, locally roasted coffee, Irish whiskey, and a dash of cream.

Sleep it Off

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Near the end of the trail, you’ll find Lafayette Hotel Swim Club that recently underwent a multi-million dollar renovation to update its 1946 bungalows, main house, and Johnny Weissmuller pool. Or, try the swanky Andaz San Diego with its rooftop pool, sexy and sleek décor, and legendary nightlife.

Photo Credits: Start at Beerlandia: Courtesy of The Brew Project; Get your education at the museum: Courtesy of San Diego History Center; Tour the tasting rooms: © MinervaStudio | Dreamstime.com; Partake in beertainment: Courtesy of Stone Brewing World Bistro Gardens; Walk the Urban Beer Trail: Courtesy of Polite Provisions; Stay: Courtesy of The Lafayette

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Vietnamese scientists make cancer leap

Posted on 31 October 2013 by admin

» Other News

 VIENTIANE: Drug dealers keep Lao police busy

 HCM CITY: HCM City seeks funds to splash out on swimming pools in schools

 JAKARTA: At least 360 Indonesians jailed for corruption

 IMUS CITY, Philippines: TIANANMEN SQUARE CRASH: Mom not told daughter died in China

 SEOUL: Drug smuggling by US troops increases, says Korea’s customs agency

 SEOUL: Korea’s court chief sees no limit in punishing Japanese sex slavery

 JAKARTA: Indonesian parents use social media to find child

 JAKARTA: Now, Indonesia’s turn to protest alleged US surveillance

 KUALA LUMPUR: M’sian govt looking into biometric IDs for foreign students

 HCM CITY: Vietnam plans new programme for oversea residents

 SEOUL: Japan’s army killed thousands of Chinese with experimental infection: paper

 HANOI: Chinese tourist fined for violating Vietnam’s sovereignty

 VIENTIANE: Lao young drinkers at risk: official

 PARIS: S’pore remains a ‘sampan’, but an upgraded one: Hsien Loong

 

» Most Viewed

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 SEOUL: Google chief to discuss software with Samsung

 YANGON: Myanmar launches first online music store

 SEOUL: Global retailers test out Seoul shopping streets

 YANGON: Nissan to build factory in Myanmar’s Bago region

 MANILA: What’s in your childâ€�s lunchbox?

 TOKYO: Panel report raps Mizuho�€™s organisational sloppiness

 DHAKA: Bangladesh political impasse eats into banks’ business

 SINGAPORE: S’pore wants more LNG to fuel electricity needs

 PARIS: S’pore remains a ‘sampan’, but an upgraded one: Hsien Loong

 JAKARTA: Indonesia speaks out against US spy facilities in Asia

 SEOUL: US alienates world with spying

 SEOUL: Korean experts to assist Laos in Angkorian temple restoration

 BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN: Look at AEC 2015 as milestone, rather than a ‘must-do’ target

 PENANG: Documenting the real meaning of Deepavali

Article source: http://asianewsnetwork.feedsportal.com/c/33359/f/566602/s/332041ee/sc/8/l/0L0Sasianewsnet0Bnet0Cnews0E534660Bhtml/story01.htm

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M’sian govt looking into biometric IDs for foreign students

Posted on 31 October 2013 by admin

Publication Date : 31-10-2013

 

The Malaysian home and education ministries will look into the prospects of providing security-featured biometric identity cards for foreign students studying in local higher education institutions.

Home Minister Dr Ahmad Zahid Hamidi said the proposed card, similar to the iKad that would be issued to the more than 2.1 million foreign workers in the country, will act as a passport and travel document for foreign students.

The iKad, to be colour-coded according to sectors for easier identification, is in the pilot stage and will include a barcode and the cardholder’s biometric information.

His ministry was discussing the planned foreign student’s card with the education ministry, Ahmad Zahid told reporters at the Parliament lobby on Wednesday.

The student’s card will also adopt the security features like a barcode and radio-frequency identification (RIFD) chip, he said.

“With the card, students will not need to carry their passports around.

“Saudi Arabia, Yemen and several Middle East countries have indicated interest in adopting such a card for their students here,” he added.

Based on the ministry’s records, there were an estimated 80,000 international students in Malaysia last year, with 200,000 expected by 2020.

On the iKad for foreign workers, Ahmad Zahid said his ministry was looking to equip all these workers with the card by the end of next year and there will be no compromise after that.

“We have informed the respective embassies that those without the card will be deported,� he said.

Ahmad Zahid said the iKad was being issued according to sectors to allow immigration officials to keep tabs via a foreign workers’ centralised management system that would be set up.

On the breakdown of the current workforce, he said 733,000 were in the manufacturing sector while the rest are in the plantation sector (347,000), services (251,000), domestic help (180,000) and agriculture (179,000).

The bulk is from Indonesia, with 935,000 migrant workers, while the others are from Nepal (359,000), Bangladesh (316,000), Myanmar (174,000) and India (117,000).

Ahmad Zahid said since 2011, some 117 employers had been charged and penalised for hiring illegal foreign workers.

 

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Vietnam plans new programme for oversea residents

Posted on 31 October 2013 by admin

» Other News

 VIENTIANE: Drug dealers keep Lao police busy

 HCM CITY: HCM City seeks funds to splash out on swimming pools in schools

 JAKARTA: At least 360 Indonesians jailed for corruption

 IMUS CITY, Philippines: TIANANMEN SQUARE CRASH: Mom not told daughter died in China

 SEOUL: Drug smuggling by US troops increases, says Korea’s customs agency

 SEOUL: Korea’s court chief sees no limit in punishing Japanese sex slavery

 JAKARTA: Indonesian parents use social media to find child

 JAKARTA: Now, Indonesia’s turn to protest alleged US surveillance

 HANOI: Vietnamese scientists make cancer leap

 KUALA LUMPUR: M’sian govt looking into biometric IDs for foreign students

 SEOUL: Japan’s army killed thousands of Chinese with experimental infection: paper

 HANOI: Chinese tourist fined for violating Vietnam’s sovereignty

 VIENTIANE: Lao young drinkers at risk: official

�� PARIS: S’pore remains a ‘sampan’, but an upgraded one: Hsien Loong

 

» Most Viewed

 BANGKOK: Social media’s sway on elections ‘growing’

 SEOUL: Google chief to discuss software with Samsung

● YANGON: Myanmar launches first online music store

â�� SEOUL: Global retailers test out Seoul shopping streets

 YANGON: Nissan to build factory in Myanmar’s Bago region

 MANILA: What’s in your child’s lunchbox?

â�� TOKYO: Panel report raps Mizuho’s organisational sloppiness

 DHAKA: Bangladesh political impasse eats into banks’ business

 SINGAPORE: S’pore wants more LNG to fuel electricity needs

 PARIS: S’pore remains a ‘sampan’, but an upgraded one: Hsien Loong

 JAKARTA: Indonesia speaks out against US spy facilities in Asia

 SEOUL: US alienates world with spying

 SEOUL: Korean experts to assist Laos in Angkorian temple restoration

 BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN: Look at AEC 2015 as milestone, rather than a ‘must-do’ target

 PENANG: Documenting the real meaning of Deepavali

Article source: http://asianewsnetwork.feedsportal.com/c/33359/f/5򅜪/s/332041f4/sc/8/l/0L0Sasianewsnet0Bnet0Cnews0E5񽨼Bhtml/story01.htm

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Japan’s army killed thousands of Chinese with experimental infection: paper

Posted on 31 October 2013 by admin

Publication Date : 31ᆞ-2013

 

The Imperial Japanese Army’s infamous medical research unit practised secret human experiments with infected fleas, killing some 2,500 Chinese civilians during the second Japanese-Chinese War, a paper claimed Wednesday.

Suh Yi-jong, a professor of sociology at Seoul National University, unveiled evidence of Unit 731’s new war crimes based on classified documents, including a record written by one of its members.

The clandestine biological and chemical warfare research team unleashed about 10,000 fleas weighing 5 grams, infected with bubonic plague in Jilin Province on June 4, 1940, according to the paper.

In Nong’an County alone, eight people were allegedly killed within three weeks after the release and the causalities increased to 607 within 100 days.

The total deaths were estimated at 2,500 in the affected areas including Xinjing, Qiangguo and Zhengjiatun, the professor claimed.

Unit 731 based in northeastern China is notorious for carrying out lethal biological and chemical experiments on civilians and war prisoners.

Suh noted that the paper is based on classified documents including a paper written by Kaneko Junichi, a bomb expert major at Unit 731. The documents have been kept in the Unit 731 Museum in Harbin, which was home to the army.

The purpose of the lethal test was conducted to verify the virus’ impact and to minimise the army’s damage from war by controlling the mass infection, Suh wrote in the paper.

 “The unit carried out tests in Nong’an in advance to brace for large-scale germ warfare in mainland China,” Suh said.

The first official title of the unit was Ishii Unit, though it was renamed the Epidemic Prevention and Water Purification Department of the Kwantung Army, more commonly known as Manchukuo Unit 731. The simplified title, Unit 731, came to common usage after 1᙭.

Numerous reports and historical documents have shown that other human subject research conducted by the unit include burying people alive, putting them in high-pressure chambers and injecting air into their veins.

 

Article source: http://asianewsnetwork.feedsportal.com/c/33359/f/566602/s/332041f5/sc/8/l/0L0Sasianewsnet0Bnet0Cnews0E534580Bhtml/story01.htm

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Chinese tourist fined for violating Vietnam’s sovereignty

Posted on 31 October 2013 by admin

» Other News

 VIENTIANE: Drug dealers keep Lao police busy

 HCM CITY: HCM City seeks funds to splash out on swimming pools in schools

 JAKARTA: At least 360 Indonesians jailed for corruption

 IMUS CITY, Philippines: TIANANMEN SQUARE CRASH: Mom not told daughter died in China

 SEOUL: Drug smuggling by US troops increases, says Korea’s customs agency

 SEOUL: Korea’s court chief sees no limit in punishing Japanese sex slavery

 JAKARTA: Indonesian parents use social media to find child

 JAKARTA: Now, Indonesia’s turn to protest alleged US surveillance

 HANOI: Vietnamese scientists make cancer leap

 KUALA LUMPUR: M’sian govt looking into biometric IDs for foreign students

 HCM CITY: Vietnam plans new programme for oversea residents

 SEOUL: Japan’s army killed thousands of Chinese with experimental infection: paper

 VIENTIANE: Lao young drinkers at risk: official

 PARIS: S’pore remains a ‘sampan’, but an upgraded one: Hsien Loong

 

» Most Viewed

 BANGKOK: Social media’s sway on elections ‘growing’

 SEOUL: Google chief to discuss software with Samsung

 YANGON: Myanmar launches first online music store

 SEOUL: Global retailers test out Seoul shopping streets

 YANGON: Nissan to build factory in Myanmar’s Bago region

 MANILA: What’s in your child’s lunchbox?

 TOKYO: Panel report raps Mizuho’s organisational sloppiness

 DHAKA: Bangladesh political impasse eats into banks’ business

 SINGAPORE: S’pore wants more LNG to fuel electricity needs

 PARIS: S’pore remains a ‘sampan’, but an upgraded one: Hsien Loong

 JAKARTA: Indonesia speaks out against US spy facilities in Asia

 SEOUL: US alienates world with spying

 SEOUL: Korean experts to assist Laos in Angkorian temple restoration

 BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN: Look at AEC 2015 as milestone, rather than a ‘must-do’ target

 PENANG: Documenting the real meaning of Deepavali

Article source: http://asianewsnetwork.feedsportal.com/c/񽕏/f/566602/s/332041f6/sc/5/l/0L0Sasianewsnet0Bnet0Cnews0E534530Bhtml/story01.htm

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Lao young drinkers at risk: official

Posted on 31 October 2013 by admin

» Other News

 VIENTIANE: Drug dealers keep Lao police busy

 HCM CITY: HCM City seeks funds to splash out on swimming pools in schools

 JAKARTA: At least 360 Indonesians jailed for corruption

 IMUS CITY, Philippines: TIANANMEN SQUARE CRASH: Mom not told daughter died in China

 SEOUL: Drug smuggling by US troops increases, says Korea’s customs agency

 SEOUL: Korea’s court chief sees no limit in punishing Japanese sex slavery

 JAKARTA: Indonesian parents use social media to find child

 JAKARTA: Now, Indonesia’s turn to protest alleged US surveillance

 HANOI: Vietnamese scientists make cancer leap

 KUALA LUMPUR: M’sian govt looking into biometric IDs for foreign students

 HCM CITY: Vietnam plans new programme for oversea residents

 SEOUL: Japan’s army killed thousands of Chinese with experimental infection: paper

 HANOI: Chinese tourist fined for violating Vietnam’s sovereignty

 PARIS: S’pore remains a ‘sampan’, but an upgraded one: Hsien Loong

 

» Most Viewed

 BANGKOK: Social media’s sway on elections ‘growing’

 SEOUL: Google chief to discuss software with Samsung

 YANGON: Myanmar launches first online music store

 SEOUL: Global retailers test out Seoul shopping streets

 YANGON: Nissan to build factory in Myanmar’s Bago region

 MANILA: What��s in your child�€™s lunchbox?

 TOKYO: Panel report raps Mizuho’s organisational sloppiness

 DHAKA: Bangladesh political impasse eats into banks’ business

 SINGAPORE: S’pore wants more LNG to fuel electricity needs

 PARIS: S’pore remains a ‘sampan’, but an upgraded one: Hsien Loong

 JAKARTA: Indonesia speaks out against US spy facilities in Asia

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S’pore remains a ‘sampan’, but an upgraded one: Hsien Loong

Posted on 31 October 2013 by admin

Publication Date : 31ᆞ-2013

 

Singapore will be in trouble if it thinks it has arrived and can afford to relax, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong indicated on Wednesday.

The country is small, and while it is no longer as poor and defenceless as it used to be, it must continue to be on its toes and work hard to improve.

Speaking to the Singapore media at the end of his official visit to France, he said “my eyes popped out” when he read a commentary in The Straits Times likening Singapore today to a cruise ship.

Commentator Koh Buck Song had argued in Monday’s Opinion pages that Singapore politicians’ oft-used metaphor of the country as a sampan (small wooden boat), easily tossed about by the waves of global competition, was no longer valid.

He said it risked promoting small-mindedness and cramping national self-confidence and ambition.

Instead, Koh said, Singapore was more like a well-oiled cruise ship that caters to every need.

As it offers the smoothest of journeys, passengers can relax because they feel secure, he added.

Lee, however, warned: “Once you think you are in a cruise ship and you are on a holiday and everything must go swimmingly well and will be attended to for you, I think you are in trouble.

“We are small, we are not as poor as we used to be, we are not defenceless, we are able to fend for ourselves and to make a living for ourselves, and we are better off than before, and I think that we need to keep on working hard, to continue improving.”

As to what might be a more appropriate metaphor, he said with a laugh: “I think we have upgraded our sampan. It’s sampan 2.0.”

He made these remarks when asked about the meetings he had held with French business leaders since he arrived on Sunday.

Lee said the businessmen had a strong regard for the Republic and saw it as very useful because they could do business in the region from Singapore.

“So it’s not just Singapore, but Singapore in the context of the region,” he pointed out.

The businessmen were keen to find out more about Singapore’s long-term strategy for economic development, and asked about the tightening of foreign talent and workers in recent years as it might have an impact on their business plans.

Lee reiterated that Singapore had to find a balance when it comes to foreigners.

He said the number of foreign workers is “still a little higher than what we would like”, but that was dependent on the state of the economy. It is now strong, and hence, there is a need for construction.

He also reiterated the need for society to integrate such that foreigners adapt to Singapore norms, and Singaporeans are open to them “in order to help ourselves prosper”.

Integration has to happen in activities on the ground, as well as public messaging, he said, adding that intemperate language on the Internet that hits out at foreigners in a dismissive way does a lot of harm to Singapore.

“This is going to be work in progress for some time to come but we have to persevere.”

Lee left Paris for Warsaw, the capital of Poland, on Wednesday.

In the next two days, he will meet Polish leaders and also visit the port city of Gdansk.

 

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