Archive | March, 2014

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‘Mad Men’ Season 7: 10 Iconic Places We Might See Don Draper

Posted on 31 March 2014 by admin

Where: Burbank, California

In season six, Don, Roger, and Harry ran into Danny Siegel, who since being fired had become a successful producer and bragged about making a movie with Jack Warner. At the time, Warner Brothers was one of the largest movie studios in the world, and produced several social dramas that reflected issues such as the Vietnam War, censorship restrictions, and crime—all issues addressed on Mad Men. The 110-acre lot contains 29 soundstages, including one of the tallest stages in the world. Perhaps this season, Megan will make a movie at Warner Brothers Studios and become a true Hollywood star.

Insider Tip: Reservations are required for studio tours, which last two hours and fifteen minutes, and will show you where some of your favorite movies were filmed. You might even see a production in progress.

Plan Your Trip: Visit Fodor’s Los Angeles Guide

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MH370 CRASH: Families of Chinese passengers vow no forgiveness for parties ‘hiding the truth’

Posted on 31 March 2014 by admin

» Other News

 MANILA: Singapore president to visit Philippines

 MANILA: Philippines prepares for World Economic Forum hosting

 HONG KONG: HK faces hurdles to outlaw ‘locust’ bias

 BANGKOK: New Senate could decide Thai PM’s fate

� MANILA: Manila files claims over South China Sea

 SEOUL: Seoul, Tokyo at odds over talks’ agenda

�Â HMAS STIRLING NAVAL BASE, Australia: MH370 CRASH: Ship carrying black box detector to set sail for search site

 KUALA LUMPUR: MH370 CRASH: M’sian airports tighten flight security

 SUBANG JAYA: MH370 CRASH: Angry relatives arrive in KL seeking apology

 MANILA: Philippines expects delivery of patrol boats from Japan

�—Â�BEIJING: MH370 CRASH: Relatives demand answers

�Â KOTA KINABALU: INDONESIA POLLS: Indonesian votes in M’sia an indicator for polls

 HANOI: Malaysian PM to visit Vietnam

�� TAIPEI: 500,000 rally at Taiwan’s Presidential Office

�‹

�

» Most Viewed

 JAKARTA: INDONESIA POLLS: More Chinese candidates

 KUALA LUMPUR: MH370 CRASH: Chinese anger unfair and excessive, say M’sians

 SINGAPORE: Is Singapore too business friendly for local firms?

�Â BATU PAHAT, Johor: MH370 CRASH: No report on ‘missed calls’ from Indonesian passenger

�� KUALA LUMPUR: MH370 CRASH: M’sian immigration to implement new screening system

 BANGKOK: Thai protest leader vows to end regime

 TOKYO: Japan’s tourism figures set to soar with more flights

 PETALING JAYA: SWEDEN CHILD ABUSE CASE: Children’s testimonies proved damning for parents

● PETALING JAYA: Be wary of virtual money, M’sians told

 PETALING JAYA: SWEDEN CHILD ABUSE CASE: M’sian couple unlikely to appeal against verdict

 PETALING JAYA: MH370 CRASH: When emotions take over

 JAKARTA: INDONESIA POLLS: Int’l community to observe elections

 KUALA LUMPUR: MH370 CRASH: M’sian airports tighten flight security

 BEIJING: Creating jobs is Chinese leaders’ chief concern

 PETALING JAYA: MH370 CRASH: Together in hope and prayers

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Fodor’s Week in Travel: Choose Your Own Adventure

Posted on 31 March 2014 by admin

Thrill seekers, rejoice! This week, we’ve covered a number of outdoor adventures that should make your next getaway an exciting one. From kayaking in Jackson Hole to hiking glaciers in Alaska to witnessing the bat migration in Zambia, we’ve got you covered. Some adventures happen on floating vessels, which is why we’ve also picked our top river cruises forł014. And because other adventures involve a mind trip, we’ve also published a guide on how to buy marijuana when visiting Colorado.

5 Reasons to Go to Jackson Hole This Spring

Kayaking, fishing, and fine dining—there’s a lot more to this mountain town than just skiing. See our five reasons to visit Jackson Hole this spring.

Best Outdoor Adventures Near Anchorage

Mother Nature puts on a can’t-miss spectacle in Alaska. Check out our picks for the best outdoor adventures near Anchorage.

10 Non-Traditional Safari Adventures

Whether you’re a safari addict stuck in a rut or a first-timer with a wild side, these 10 non-traditional safari adventures will help you find your way off the beaten path.

10 Best River Cruises for 2014

Our list of the 10 best river cruises for 2014 spans the globe, from the winding Mekong to the sunlit Bordeaux.

Pot Tourism: How to Buy Marijuana in Colorado

If you’re planning a trip for recreational highs, read our guide on how to buy marijuana in Colorado.

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MH370 CRASH: Relatives demand answers

Posted on 31 March 2014 by admin

Publication Date : 31-03-20Ǯ

 

About 50 family members of the Chinese passengers on board missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 called for answers at a news conference in Kuala Lumpur, as the search for the aircraft comes under increasing time pressure.

After their arrival in the Malaysian capital on Sunday morning, 35 relatives, in addition to about 10 who had been there for more than two weeks, held a news conference at about 3 pm, calling for “evidence, truth and the return of family members”.

On March 8, a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 to Beijing went missing shortly after it took off from Kuala Lumpur carrying 239 people, including 154 Chinese.

Jiang Hui, a representative of the group, made three requests of the Malaysian government and Malaysia Airlines: timely and comprehensive answers to questions from relatives, an apology for the confusing information which led to a delay in the search, and an apology for announcing the aircraft crashed without direct evidence.

Relatives are also asking for a meeting with Boeing, engine maker Rolls Royce and satellite company Inmarsat, whose information was crucial in leading the Malaysian government to make its judgment on the crash.

The disappearance of MH370 has been shrouded in many unresolved questions, including a mysterious change of course and frequent changes of information disclosure.

Anxiety grows as black box’s battery runs down

The family members said they would seek to communicate with the Malaysian government, Malaysia Airlines, and the search and rescue expert teams with the help from the Chinese embassy and would refrain from emotional protests like in Beijing on Tuesday.

“We will express our requests rationally and legally,” Jiang said.

On the arrival of the relatives, Chinese Ambassador Huang Kanghui and Ong Ka Ting, the Malaysian prime minister’s special envoy to China, greeted them at the hotel.

“I’m sure in Beijing they’ve already had a lot of discussions, and we understand their feelings, and we know that definitely by coming over here there will be a lot more discussions and meetings,” Ong said. “So we try our best to assist them.”

In Beijing, another senior relative, who chose not to go to Kuala Lumpur, said he was not satisfied with the responses in the daily briefings held by Malaysia Airlines and the Malaysian government, although he understood that the working team sent to Beijing did not get enough information to be released to relatives.

“Our family will not go to Malaysia because there was not that much information there either. However, relatives in Malaysia could better express their demands as they could meet Malaysian government officials as well as the working team from China,” he said.

The families’ anxiety is increasing further as the flight data recorder, also known as the black box, faces the end of its battery life, which usually lasts for about one month.

Australian navy ship Ocean Shield, which carries black box detecting devices, will start work on Monday, but it will take three to four days to arrive in the search zone.

On Sunday, a Chinese air force Ilyushin 76 became the first of nine aircraft to leave a search base in Perth, West Australia.

Four Chinese navy vessels and three civilian vessels arrived in the 320,000 square kilometers designated area on Sunday.

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott described the search efforts as positive because objects “have been recovered from the ocean”.

Hou Liqiang contributed to this story.

 

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MH370 CRASH: Ship carrying black box detector to set sail for search site

Posted on 31 March 2014 by admin

Publication Date : 31-03-2014

 

A ship fitted with a black box locator will set off for the southern Indian Ocean today as a multinational search party races to locate the missing Malaysia Airlines plane before its black box battery dies.

The equipment cannot, however, be used until debris from the plane is found and traced back to its crash site.

Much of the three-week-old hunt for Flight MH370 is still focused on a visual scan of the surface of the sea some 1,850km west of Perth, over an area 319,000 sq km in size – slightly smaller than the size of Malaysia.

Yesterday, a total of nine aircraft as well as eight ships were involved in the search.

The Boeing 777-200ER jetliner that left Kuala Lumpur with 239 people on board was due to arrive in Beijing on Marchň.

It disappeared from civilian radar screens that morning and mysteriously veered far off-course into the southern Indian Ocean, investigations show.

Any debris sighted needs to be identified with the missing plane before experts can zero in on its real location on the seabed and solve what has turned out to be one of the world’s biggest aviation puzzles yet.

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott yesterday appointed former defence chief Angus Houston as the head of a new coordination centre that will work with search partners, including Malaysia, the United States, China, Japan and New Zealand.

The Joint Agency Coordination Centre will also help relatives of passengers with travel advice and interpretation services.

Malaysia’s Acting Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein promised on Saturday to set up an international panel to look into the plane’s disappearance.

The American black box detector picks up the “pings” emitted by beacons in the flight data recorders, but it can scan only a distance of 1ǒkm at one time and has to be towed at a maximum speed of about 5kmh.

The US Navy’s Captain Mark Matthews, overseeing the operations of the towed pinger locator, told reporters at Stirling naval base, south of Perth, yesterday: “If we find debris today, it has been in the water 22 days. Where did it start (from) 22 days ago? That is what we need the oceanographers to model.

“Right now, with hundreds of thousands of sq km of search area, I don’t know where to start.”

On paper, the beacons can send out signals for 30 days, but “in our experience, they last a bit longer than that”, he said.

“Every day past 30 days, there is a lower and lower probability,” he said.

“Certainly, 45 days is the realistic point to say the ‘pinger’ is probably no longer emitting.”

The Australian ship Ocean Shield, on which the towed pinger locator would be fitted, will take about three days to get to the site.

Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said in a Facebook post last night that his government is fully committed to the search operation and will not stop until the plane is found.

He also thanked the Australian government and other nations involved in the search efforts for the missing jetliner.

Malaysia Airlines said yesterday it would make arrangements to fly family members to Perth once wreckage is found.

 

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MH370 CRASH: M’sian airports tighten flight security

Posted on 31 March 2014 by admin

Publication Date : 31-03-2014

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Malaysia Airlines (MAS) and Malaysia Airports Holdings Bhd (MAHB) have tightened flight security in the air and on the ground in the wake of the Flight MH370 tragedy.

The pilot and a co-pilot are now not allowed to be left alone in the cockpit, even when one of them is taking a toilet break, according to a MAS circular.

Under the new rules, a cabin crew member has to be in the cockpit until the pilot or co-pilot returns from the restroom.

When bringing food to the cockpit, a flight attendant is required to stand guard at the door to make sure no passenger enters the restricted area.

Captain Missman Leham, MAS chief pilot for flight safety and human factors, issued the circular to all flight deck crews.

On the ground, MAHB has made it mandatory for anyone taking an international flight to pass through two metal-detectors and undergo a body search before they board.

The travellers must now also remove their shoes, belt, jackets and any electronic devices such as cellphones and laptop computers for separate scanning. Bottled drinking water is not allowed to be brought aboard.

The United States, Britain and Australia had asked that security checks on all passengers flying to the countries be increased.

MAHB has also extended such checks to other international flights and has adopted the same prohibited items list applied by the US Trans-portation Security Administration.

The rules came into effect the week of March 8, the day that Flight MH370 to Beijing from Kuala Lumpur disappeared with 239 passengers and crew aboard.

A MAS spokesman confirmed that the airline has increased security and enhanced monitoring procedures on board all its aircraft.

“However, for security purposes we are unable to discuss any of these procedures publicly.

“Security checks are mandated by the aviation security authorities and conducted by them,” the spokesman said.

There are already several security and safety procedures for cockpit crew and aircraft, a MAS pilot told The Star.

He said there was a rule that pilot and co-pilot were each served a different set of meal, which was to avoid any likelihood of both coming down with food poisoning at the same time.

“Another measure requires crew members to thoroughly check all compartments in the cockpit, cabin, crew rest areas, galley and toilets for any foreign objects before the passengers board.

“Stewards and stewardesses must also watch out for travellers behaving suspiciously or passengers taking hand luggage into the toilet,” said the pilot who asked not to be identified.

MAHB reminded all travellers departing from the KLIA for international destinations that they should check in within the stipulated three-hour period.

“This is so that they will have adequate time to clear immigration and security checks. The stringent checks are for the safety of the aircraft, passengers and crew, and everyone should give us their full cooperation,” said the spokesman.

 

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MH370 CRASH: Angry relatives arrive in KL seeking apology

Posted on 31 March 2014 by admin

Publication Date : 31-03-2014

 

About 30 relatives of Chinese passengers flew to Kuala Lumpur to angrily press for an apology from the Malaysian government for its handling of the missing plane crisis.

They blame Malaysia for providing conflicting information, for causing delays to the search and rescue operation and, finally, for concluding that the plane had crashed with no survivors without producing any physical evidence.

“We want proof, we want our families, we want the truth,” they chanted in unison at a media conference on arrival yesterday in Malaysia’s capital.

The group unfurled two Chinese flags and four banners at Holiday Villa Hotel in Subang Jaya yesterday. “Hand us the murderers,” read one banner in English.

They also demanded meetings with, among others, US aircraft manufacturer Boeing, British jet engine maker Rolls-Royce and satellite firm Inmarsat, as they vowed to get to the bottom of how and why Malaysia Airlines (MAS) Flight MH370 disappeared three weeks ago.

“Why haven’t any representatives from these companies made an appearance? Is there something wrong with their products?” asked Jiang Hui, a spokesman for the Chinese family members.

He said those who could would stay in the country until their demands are met.

The missing MAS plane is a Boeing 777-200ER fitted with two Rolls-Royce Trent 800 engines. Inmarsat is the British satellite firm which ran analyses that led to Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak’s conclusion that the Beijing-bound plane had ended its flight in the southern Indian Ocean.

“It is strange. The longer these companies keep quiet, the more their reputations are at stake. They should be the ones asking to meet us,” a factory worker, Zhang, whose wife was on board MH370, told The Straits Times. He declined to give his full name.

Decked in white T-shirts printed with the message “Pray for MH370″ – what they wore during their protest last Tuesday at the Malaysian Embassy in Beijing – the Chinese family members said they had decided to come to Kuala Lumpur after three “useless” meetings with high-level Malaysian delegates in Beijing.

“They just kept saying they will investigate and get back to us,” Jiang told the media yesterday. “That is why we are here.”

MAS said 37 family members flew in. However, the Malaysian Chinese Association, a political party which is providing support for them, put the number at 29.

A smaller group of aboutಔ Chinese family members arrived earlier and have been staying at Hotel Bangi in Putrajaya for more than two weeks.

Another family member, a Liu, told The Straits Times he found it unacceptable that MH370 could fly through Malaysian airspace unhindered after the Beijing-bound plane turned back sharply and re-crossed the Malaysian peninsula.

“The plane disappeared from civilian radar by 1:30am. If the Malaysian military radar picked up a ‘blip’ an hour later, how could nothing be done about it?” Liu asked. “Either the air traffic controllers or the air force was too slow to react. If they had been more responsible, this tragedy could have been prevented.”

Chinese resentment against the Malaysian government has grown since MH370 vanished on March8. Angry family members accused the Malaysian government of a cover-up, calling the officials “murderers” and demanding the “unconditional return” of their loved ones.

Yesterday’s group of mostly male relatives was calm, with no major emotional outbursts. They arrived at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in the morning after taking a red-eye MAS flight from Beijing.

Some 50 members of the media and around 20 volunteers from the Malaysian Chinese Association’s crisis relief squad waited for them from early morning at the arrival hall, but they were taken to their coaches via a secret lane to avoid the media.

The families also spoke to Chinese Ambassador to Malaysia Huang Huikang at a closed-door meeting. They were told the Malaysian government would unveil detailed information on the bizarre disappearance of MH370 along with its 239 passengers and crew. Almost two- thirds of those on board were Chinese citizens.

 

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Seoul, Tokyo at odds over talks’ agenda

Posted on 31 March 2014 by admin

» Other News

 MANILA: Singapore president to visit Philippines

 MANILA: Philippines prepares for World Economic Forum hosting

 HONG KONG: HK faces hurdles to outlaw ‘locust’ bias

 BANGKOK: New Senate could decide Thai PM’s fate

� MANILA: Manila files claims over South China Sea

 HMAS STIRLING NAVAL BASE, Australia: MH370 CRASH: Ship carrying black box detector to set sail for search site

 KUALA LUMPUR: MH370 CRASH: M’sian airports tighten flight security

 SUBANG JAYA: MH370 CRASH: Angry relatives arrive in KL seeking apology

 MANILA: Philippines expects delivery of patrol boats from Japan

�Â BEIJING: MH370 CRASH: Relatives demand answers

 KOTA KINABALU: INDONESIA POLLS: Indonesian votes in M’sia an indicator for polls

 HANOI: Malaysian PM to visit Vietnam

 TAIPEI: 500,000 rally at Taiwan’s Presidential Office

 BEIJING: Going the extra mile to highlight M’sia-China ties

� 

� Most Viewed

 JAKARTA: INDONESIA POLLS: More Chinese candidates

 KUALA LUMPUR: MH370 CRASH: Chinese anger unfair and excessive, say M’sians

 SINGAPORE: Is Singapore too business friendly for local firms?

 BATU PAHAT, Johor: MH370 CRASH: No report on ‘missed calls’ from Indonesian passenger

KUALA LUMPUR: MH370 CRASH: M’sian immigration to implement new screening system

 BANGKOK: Thai protest leader vows to end regime

 TOKYO: Japan’s tourism figures set to soar with more flights

 PETALING JAYA: SWEDEN CHILD ABUSE CASE: Children’s testimonies proved damning for parents

 PETALING JAYA: Be wary of virtual money, M’sians told

 PETALING JAYA: SWEDEN CHILD ABUSE CASE: M’sian couple unlikely to appeal against verdict

 PETALING JAYA: MH370 CRASH: When emotions take over

 JAKARTA: INDONESIA POLLS: Intâ€�l community to observe elections

 PETALING JAYA: MH370 CRASH: Together in hope and prayers

 BEIJING: Creating jobs is Chinese leaders’ chief concern

 PETALING JAYA: Tension around Thailand’s ballot box

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Manila files claims over South China Sea

Posted on 31 March 2014 by admin

Publication Date : 31-03-2014

 

The Philippines pressed ahead yesterday with its formal plea before a United Nations tribunal contesting China’s vast claims over the South China Sea, amid another tense stand-off at a disputed rocky outcrop and a fresh barrage of threats from Beijing.

In a 4,000-page “memorial” – diplomatic speak for “memorandum” – sent to the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea, Manila alleges that China’s nine-dash line claims areas far beyond its borders.

That line encloses 90 per cent of the 3.5 million sq km South China Sea and spreads deep into territories claimed not just by the Philippines, but also by Brunei, Malaysia, Vietnam and Taiwan.

Manila maintains that the areas in the South China Sea that Beijing insists are parts of its territories extend as far as 870 nautical miles (1,611km) from the nearest Chinese shore, violating the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.

It is asking the international tribunal to recognise its exclusive economic zone, which extends 200 nautical miles from Philippine shores, overlapping many of the shoals, reefs and islets that have been the sites of tense stand-offs between Manila and Beijing.

“It is about defending what is legitimately ours,” Foreign Secretary Albert del Rosario said at a news conference yesterday.

The memorial consists of 4,000 pages spread over 10 volumes that contain Manila’s arguments, evidence and maps to support its case against China. The Philippines first filed its case against China in January last year.

Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Hong Lei, who had earlier warned the Philippines against proceeding with the case, said yesterday that China will not accept international arbitration on the South China Sea.

He urged the Philippines to stick to the Declaration on the Conduct of Parties in the South China Sea and return to bilateral talks in resolving disputes.

The tribunal is now expected to give Beijing time to reconsider its refusal to participate and submit oral arguments against Manila’s memorial. It may also embark on an ocular inspection of the contested areas, and then it can begin its hearings.

Solicitor-General Francis Jardeleza, the government’s chief lawyer who is leading the case, has said the earliest the five-member tribunal can issue a ruling is mid-2ዐ.

Legal experts say that while legally binding, any ruling will effectively be unenforceable, as there is no peacekeeping force that can compel China to obey it.

Still, Paul Reichler, the Philippines’ lead counsel in the case, said losing parties comply “at least 95 per cent” of the time.

On Saturday, four Chinese coast guard vessels tried to block two Philippine navy boats sent to re-supply marines stationed on the BRP Sierra Madre, a ship Manila ran aground in 1999 on the Second Thomas Shoal to stake its claim. The Philippine boats managed to reach the grounded ship, but not until after two Chinese ships cut off their paths twice.

On March 9, China turned away a Philippine re-supply boat. In December, the Chinese coast guard used water cannon to drive away Philippine boats at another contested islet, Scarborough Shoal.

 

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New Senate could decide Thai PM’s fate

Posted on 31 March 2014 by admin

Publication Date : 31-03-2014

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Polls opened yesterday for 77 Senate seats that could hold the key to the fate of caretaker Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, who, after five months of street protests, may face impeachment for negligence of duty.

While the Senate is officially non-partisan, in reality the two main political camps – the ruling Pheu Thai Party and opposition Democrat Party – are trying to control the 150-seat Upper House in the absence of a functioning Lower House after the election last month was annulled.

From unofficial results last night, it was obvious that winning candidates are likely to come from the two rival parties, or the red-shirt and anti-government camps. Most top contenders are former ministers or party members, MPs, or politicians’ relatives. Some of them are close to anti-government protesters.

Former Auditor General Khunying Jaruwan Maintaka appeared to win the Senate poll in Bangkok with more than 500,000 votes while about one million people voted. Jaruwan, who is known as a tireless opponent of ex-premier Thaksin Shinawatra, vowed not to disappoint the people who voted for her. “I will be determined in protecting the national assets,” Jaruwan said after she learned the unofficial results.

Appointed Senator Khamnoon Sitthisamarn posted a note on Facebook saying Jaruwan is qualified to contest the post of Senate speaker if she wants.

The anti-Thaksin regime group, or representatives of the Democrat Party, are also likely to sweep seats in several southern provinces and some eastern provinces such as ex-Democrat MP Boonsong Khaiket in Trat.

In Prachuap Khiri Khan, former provincial administrative organisation president Suebyos Baiyaem is the likely winner. He is backed by former Democrat secretary |general Chalermchai Sri-on. In Chumphon, Pol Colonel Narin Butsayawit, son of former Chumphon MP Narrong Butsayawit, got a big boost from a key leader of the People’s Democratic Reform Committee and is likely to win

Senate candidates likely to win who are government supporters include former Chart Thai Pattana MP Jongchai Thiangtham in Suphan Buri and Monthien Songpracha in Chai Nat. Monthien is believed to be a Pheu Thai supporter as his wife has become a party member.

In Chiang Mai, Adisorn Kamnerdsiri, former Chiang Mai deputy governor, who has close ties with Pheu Thai, is tipped to win.

In Khon Kaen, red-shirt lawyer Wan Suwanpong has left his competition far behind. In Udon Thani, red-shirt hardliner Kwanchai Praipana’s wife Arporn Sarakham won up to 300,000 votes to take the seat.

Anti-government protesters are pushing for the removal of Yingluck as PM. The earliest this could happen would be through an impeachment, which would require votes from three-fifths of the Senate if she is found guilty by the National Anti-Corruption Commission (NACC) on charges of dereliction of duty for her role in overseeing the rice-pledging scheme. Yingluck is due to appear before the NACC today.

Observers said the elected portion could install many pro-government members to help bolster the administration in the face of looming legal challenges. However, a Senate dominated by anti-government politicians could hasten her exit.

The unelected senators are appointed by institutions seen as allied to the anti-government protesters, such as the Constitutional Court and the Election Commission.

Election Commissioner Somchai Srisuthiyakorn said the half-Senate ballots went smoothly across the country yesterday except in Narathiwat, where two police were killed in a bomb attack. In Nakhon Pathom, a voter was charged with destroying a ballot paper. Six electoral complaints were filed – two in Bangkok and others in Nakhon Pathom, Nong Bua Lamphu and Chiang Mai.

Caretaker Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra turned up at about noon to vote at polling unit No 32 at Khlong Lamchiak School in Bung Kum district.

Democrat Party leader Abhisit Vejjajiva said yesterday he would submit a doctor’s certificate to the EC to prove he could not physically cast a ballot.

He said his doctor had instructed he rest and refrain from moving his body after undergoing surgery to fix his collarbone. Abhisit slipped in a bathroom last week at his house on Sukhumvit road. He said the injury is still painful after the surgery.

EC deputy secretary general Somsak Suriyamongkol said many provinces in the North saw a high voter turnout, such as Loei, Phayao and Chiang Mai, plus regions such as Phetchabun and Chachoengsao.

In Nakhon Ratchasima, there were many “no votes” in the 32 districts with many constituencies in Muang district seeing a higher number than the total votes received by the winner.

 

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