Archive | October, 2014

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Anwar’s defence raises the issue of contamination

Posted on 31 October 2014 by admin

» Other News

 PUTRAJAYA: Dr Mahathir: Absolute equality between sexes a ‘stupid idea’

 SINGAPORE: Rocket blows up with piece of S’pore research

 SEOUL: S. Korea, Germany to share experience on unification

 BEIJING: No mention of China’s ex-security czar Zhou Yongkang as he is retired, says CCP

 KARACHI: Cyclone Nilofar weakening in Pakistan

 BANGKOK: Thailand sees huge rise in discarded styrofoam

 SINGAPORE: M’sia-S’pore venture exempted from paying development charge on former railway land

 SEOUL: Korean politicians attempt last-minute compromise on Sewol bill

 JAKARTA: The coming of Indonesia’s Fish Lady

 JAKARTA: Indonesia’s foreign minister vows to put people first

 BEIJING: Youthful detection no defence against China’s rising breast cancer incidence

 JAKARTA: Andi Widjajanto named as Jokowi Cabinet secretary

 JAKARTA: Jokowi praised for record number of women in cabinet

 SINGAPORE: Thai DPM: Thai people are not that dumb… they would agree

 KUALA LUMPUR: Approval rating of Malaysian PM Najib slips to its lowest-ever: Poll

 

» Most Viewed

 PUTRAJAYA: Dr Mahathir: Absolute equality between sexes a ‘stupid idea’

 SEOUL: S. Korea, Germany to share experience on unification

 SINGAPORE: Rocket blows up with piece of S’pore research

● BEIJING: No mention of China’s ex-security czar Zhou Yongkang as he is retired, says CCP

 SINGAPORE: S’pore market reacts calmly to Fed move

 YANGON: Myanmar’s jade trade grinds to halt over battles for Kachin mines

 HONG KONG: HK PROTEST: Fears of ‘hawks’ taking over opposing camps

 BANGKOK: Thailand sees huge rise in discarded styrofoam

 SINGAPORE: Meet world’s best private banking leader, in S’pore

 KARACHI: Cyclone Nilofar weakening in Pakistan

 SINGAPORE: Nationality not a recipe for good food

 SINGAPORE: M’sia-S’pore venture exempted from paying development charge on former railway land

PYONGYANG: Japan-N. Korea meet highlights gaps

 JAKARTA: Indonesia’s foreign minister vows to put people first

 BANGKOK: SPECIAL REPORT: A year later … was it worth it?

 


Article source: http://asianewsnetwork.feedsportal.com/c/33359/f/566602/s/40021971/sc/8/l/0L0Sasianewsnet0Bnet0Cnews0E667690Bhtml/story01.htm

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HK PROTEST: Fears of ‘hawks’ taking over opposing camps

Posted on 31 October 2014 by admin

Publication Date : 31-Ǫ-2014

 

The leaving of peaceful protestors heightens the risk of possible violence

 

As moderates in the ongoing political crisis exit the scene, fears are growing that hardline elements on both sides will gain the upper hand, increasing the risk of chaos or violence ahead.

After last week’s failed talks between the government and student protesters, there are no more mediators for fresh dialogue, say those in the know, leaving a void for the more militant to move in.

In the anti-Occupy camp, there are “hawkish” proponents who believe that force should be deployed decisively before too long to show the protesters who is boss, according to a source from the Hong Kong establishment. Among the protesters are some who are “quite happy to see chaos”, he added.

Civic Party legislator Ronny Tong, a member of the pro-democracy camp who has been involved in meetings with the protesters, said: “Any suggestion that they leave (the protest sites) are met with very severe reactions. It’s not a matter of rational discussion any more.”

The hardliners include members of radical political group Civic Passion, activists who first met on online platforms such as the popular Golden Forum, and certain figures within the Federation of Students (FS), he added.

With China not wanting Hong Kong to be the focus of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (Apec) meetings starting in Beijing next Friday and ending on Nov 11, the next week or so will likely see a continued limbo.

Some believe this is a golden opportunity to broker a detente, but it seems unlikely for now as both sides stick to their positions.

“The soonest any action will be taken is after Apec. The leaders will make their calculations then,” said a mainland source.

As the Occupy movement enters its 34th day today, it is anyone’s guess what the ultimate endgame will be.

The most likely scenario is that Beijing will let the protest drag on indefinitely, as winter approaches and public unhappiness grows.

Meanwhile, moderates on both sides are sounding the warning that those who tried to work for a peaceful exit for the protesters are themselves leaving the scene. Their absence heightens the risk of miscalculations, possibly leading to a violent denouement.

Those leaving include the original Occupy organisers Benny Tai and Chan Kin Man, who announced on Tuesday that they are returning to their teaching duties at the universities. They stressed that they remain involved in the movement. Both men had struggled to exert a moderating influence on key decisions made by the FS, which this week called for a meeting with Premier Li Keqiang.

Similarly sidelined in the establishment camp are certain doves who had helped to broker informal discussions. Said one of them, who declined to be named: “I have been out of it for the past one, almost two weeks.”

Third-party mediators like Chinese University of Hong Kong vice-chancellor Joseph Sung and political science academic Joseph Chan are also out of the picture.

Legislative Council president Jasper Tsang, in an earlier interview, was despondent about the prospects of a peaceful resolution.

The establishment source said the “mainstream” in the Hong Kong government wants talks but will not budge on offering more concessions to end the impasse. Hovering in the wings are hawks who have long felt that Beijing had overindulged the city and believe the protesters should be forcibly removed. Even if so, it will be left to the Hong Kong government to disperse the protesters.

However, a niggling fear is that if protesters were to push back too hard and overwhelm the 30,000-strong police force, this will give hardliners in the establishment an excuse to invoke the article in the Basic Law that allows the use of Chinese troops to maintain “public order”.

“That will be the end of ‘one country, two systems’,” said the source.

- See more at: http://www.stasiareport.com/the-big-story/asia-report/hong-kong/story/hong-kong-protests-fears-hawks-taking-over-opposing-camps-#sthash.J2veFjqn.dpuf

 

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Japan-N. Korea meet highlights gaps

Posted on 31 October 2014 by admin

Publication Date : 31-10-2014

 

The latest Japan-North Korea talks were marked by a failure to see eye-to-eye on Pyongyang’s reinvestigation into the fate of Japanese nationals in that country.

The gap was particularly evident in the update given to a Japanese government delegation by North Korea’s special investigative commission, regarding progress in its probe into the matter. Japanese officials heard a unilateral declaration by the fact-finding panel that its investigation into the remains of Japanese who died in North Korea around the end of World War II had been completed.

The remains of Japanese are among four themes within the panel’s ongoing investigation.

The issue is regarded by many as relatively straightforward for Pyongyang to address, thereby making it possible for the investigation commission to tell Tokyo that progress has been made in this respect.

This is in stark contrast to the Japanese assertion that the investigative panel must explore the fate of the Japanese abductees, first and foremost.

According to the Health, Labour and Welfare Ministry, the remains of an estimated 21,ᔘ Japanese are buried in North Korea. Those Japanese died of starvation, diseases and other causes amid the confusion arising from the war’s end in many parts of that country.

The bilateral talks, which took place Tuesday and Wednesday, lasted for a total of about 10 and a half hours, and were attended by officials from the Foreign Ministry and elsewhere in Tokyo as well as senior officials of the commission. The Japanese delegation was led by Junichi Ihara, director general of the ministry’s Asian and Oceanian Affairs Bureau.

After Wednesday’s talks, Ihara told reporters that his delegation had received a relatively favourable response from the investigation panel. �œThey offered us explanations in line with the objective [of the delegation’s visit to Pyongyang],” he said.

“Japan-North Korea talks will continue in the future, too,” a Foreign Ministry official said immediately after Wednesday’s meeting.

However, all members of the delegation remained silent about how North Korea reacted to Japan’s assertions and what was said during the series of bilateral talks.

The two-day talks came after Tokyo and Pyongyang agreed in July that the probe into the fate of the abductees and other Japanese would be wrapped up within a year, with an initial report to be issued by North Korea �œsometime between late summer and early autumn.”

However, the situation took a turn in September when North Korea told Japan that it would put off issuing its first report, saying, “The investigation is in an early stage.”

Later, Pyongyang told Tokyo that Japanese officials should visit the North Korean capital if they wanted to obtain information about progress in its reinvestigation.

Many family members of those kidnapped were apprehensive that such a visit could allow North Korea to proceed with bilateral negotiations over the abduction problem in a manner that would suit its own interests.

With this in mind, the Japanese government told North Korea that it would not regard the latest talks as a meeting aimed at reaching at any form of agreement between Tokyo and Pyongyang, or as an occasion to receive an official report from the reclusive state.

Japan insisted the talks must instead serve as an opportunity to directly convey Tokyo’s position to officials of the investigative panel, while also seeking answers from the commission about the situation surrounding the probe.

Nonetheless, the investigation commission unilaterally told the Japanese officials that it had completed a full probe into the remains of Japanese nationals.

According to the Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry, there are ȧ cemeteries for the remains of Japanese nationals in the suburbs of Pyongyang and elsewhere.

North Korea told Japan that it wanted Tokyo to settle the issue of the remains as soon as possible, saying, “[These cemeteries] are hindering work to create and improve residential areas and roads.”

North Korea has placed its priority on the issue of the remains with an apparent aim to give the impression that its investigation is progressing. At the same time, Pyongyang has avoided giving a clear response over the investigation on the abduction issue, saying that the probe is in the early stages.

Many Japanese government officials are voicing concern over Pyongyang’s reactions, saying the reactions reflect North Korea’s conventional tactics of trying to perplex Japan.

 

Article source: http://asianewsnetwork.feedsportal.com/c/333ț/f/566602/s/40022e61/sc/39/l/0L0Sasianewsnet0Bnet0Cnews0E667740Bhtml/story01.htm

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Prosecution refutes Anwar’s allegations of conspiracy

Posted on 31 October 2014 by admin

» Other News

 PUTRAJAYA: Dr Mahathir: Absolute equality between sexes a ‘stupid idea’

 SINGAPORE: Rocket blows up with piece of S’pore research

 SEOUL: S. Korea, Germany to share experience on unification

 BEIJING: No mention of China’s ex-security czar Zhou Yongkang as he is retired, says CCP

� KARACHI: Cyclone Nilofar weakening in Pakistan

 BANGKOK: Thailand sees huge rise in discarded styrofoam

 SINGAPORE: M’sia-S’pore venture exempted from paying development charge on former railway land

 SEOUL: Korean politicians attempt last-minute compromise on Sewol bill

 JAKARTA: The coming of Indonesia’s Fish Lady

JAKARTA: Indonesia’s foreign minister vows to put people first

 BEIJING: Youthful detection no defence against China’s rising breast cancer incidence

● JAKARTA: Andi Widjajanto named as Jokowi Cabinet secretary

 JAKARTA: Jokowi praised for record number of women in cabinet

 SINGAPORE: Thai DPM: Thai people are not that dumb… they would agree

 KUALA LUMPUR: Approval rating of Malaysian PM Najib slips to its lowest-ever: Poll

 

» Most Viewed

 PUTRAJAYA: Dr Mahathir: Absolute equality between sexes a ‘stupid idea’

 SEOUL: S. Korea, Germany to share experience on unification

 SINGAPORE: Rocket blows up with piece of S’pore research

 BEIJING: No mention of China’s ex-security czar Zhou Yongkang as he is retired, says CCP

 SINGAPORE: S’pore market reacts calmly to Fed move

 YANGON: Myanmar’s jade trade grinds to halt over battles for Kachin mines

 HONG KONG: HK PROTEST: Fears of ‘hawks’ taking over opposing camps

 BANGKOK: Thailand sees huge rise in discarded styrofoam

 SINGAPORE: Meet world’s best private banking leader, in S’pore

 KARACHI: Cyclone Nilofar weakening in Pakistan

● SINGAPORE: Nationality not a recipe for good food

â�� SINGAPORE: M’sia-S’pore venture exempted from paying development charge on former railway land

 PYONGYANG: Japan-N. Korea meet highlights gaps

 JAKARTA: Indonesia’s foreign minister vows to put people first

 BANGKOK: SPECIAL REPORT: A year later … was it worth it?

 


Article source: http://asianewsnetwork.feedsportal.com/c/33359/f/566602/s/񾽖e6b/sc/8/l/0L0Sasianewsnet0Bnet0Cnews0E667730Bhtml/story01.htm

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Taiwan prosecutors indict former Ting Hsin chairman, seek 30 years in prison

Posted on 31 October 2014 by admin

» Other News

 PUTRAJAYA: Dr Mahathir: Absolute equality between sexes a ‘stupid idea’

 SINGAPORE: Rocket blows up with piece of S’pore research

 SEOUL: S. Korea, Germany to share experience on unification

 BEIJING: No mention of China’s ex-security czar Zhou Yongkang as he is retired, says CCP

� KARACHI: Cyclone Nilofar weakening in Pakistan

 BANGKOK: Thailand sees huge rise in discarded styrofoam

 SINGAPORE: M’sia-S’pore venture exempted from paying development charge on former railway land

 SEOUL: Korean politicians attempt last-minute compromise on Sewol bill

 JAKARTA: The coming of Indonesia’s Fish Lady

JAKARTA: Indonesia’s foreign minister vows to put people first

 BEIJING: Youthful detection no defence against China’s rising breast cancer incidence

● JAKARTA: Andi Widjajanto named as Jokowi Cabinet secretary

 JAKARTA: Jokowi praised for record number of women in cabinet

 SINGAPORE: Thai DPM: Thai people are not that dumb… they would agree

 KUALA LUMPUR: Approval rating of Malaysian PM Najib slips to its lowest-ever: Poll

 

» Most Viewed

 PUTRAJAYA: Dr Mahathir: Absolute equality between sexes a ‘stupid idea’

 SEOUL: S. Korea, Germany to share experience on unification

 SINGAPORE: Rocket blows up with piece of S’pore research

 BEIJING: No mention of China’s ex-security czar Zhou Yongkang as he is retired, says CCP

 SINGAPORE: S’pore market reacts calmly to Fed move

 YANGON: Myanmar’s jade trade grinds to halt over battles for Kachin mines

 HONG KONG: HK PROTEST: Fears of ‘hawks’ taking over opposing camps

 BANGKOK: Thailand sees huge rise in discarded styrofoam

 SINGAPORE: Meet world’s best private banking leader, in S’pore

 KARACHI: Cyclone Nilofar weakening in Pakistan

● SINGAPORE: Nationality not a recipe for good food

â�� SINGAPORE: M’sia-S’pore venture exempted from paying development charge on former railway land

 PYONGYANG: Japan-N. Korea meet highlights gaps

 JAKARTA: Indonesia’s foreign minister vows to put people first

 BANGKOK: SPECIAL REPORT: A year later … was it worth it?

 


Article source: http://asianewsnetwork.feedsportal.com/c/33359/f/566602/s/�ed/sc/24/l/0L0Sasianewsnet0Bnet0Cnews0E667790Bhtml/story01.htm

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Consensus sought with US on governance of Internet

Posted on 31 October 2014 by admin

Publication Date : 31-10-2014

 

Beijing wants to seek consensus with Washington at an upcoming worldwide network summit on how the Internet should be governed, an official at China’s cyberspace watchdog said on Thursday.

Talks and communications relating to the Internet between the US and China have gone smoothly recently, said Lu Wei, director of the Cyberspace Administration of China, at a news conference in Beijing.

“I believe that we can forge more agreements and maintain Sino-US relations at the forthcoming World Internet Conference,” Lu said.

To date, the conference, which will be held in Wuzhen, Zhejiang province, from Nov 19 to 21, has attracted more than 1,000 applicants from nearly 100 countries and regions, the authority said.

Most of the applicants are from the United States, including government officials, Internet tycoons and cyberspace specialists, according to the authority.

“I’m looking forward to attending the Wuzhen summit, discussing Internet related issues and developing agreements with these applicants. We don’t want to see cyberspace affecting Sino-US ties,” Lu said.

Zhejiang Governor Li Qiang said the summit is an opportunity for the province to push forward the information technology industry.

Participants will discuss key Internet related issues, including mobile networks, cross border e-commerce, cybersecurity and online antiterrorism measures, Li said, adding that it is the first time that China has held such a highlevel cyberspace conference.

Lu said China is one of the nations worst hit by online threats, with more than 10,000 Chinese websites attacked every month, of which about 80 percent are government ones.

Lu said these threats come mainly from the US, adding that China has always taken a strong approach to those using their technical skills on the Internet to attack other countries and steal information from them.

Referring to US websites that cannot be accessed in China, such as Facebook, he said that cyberspace in China will continue to be governed by Chinese laws.

“What we do is in accordance with our laws, and all the moves we take are aimed at protecting our cybersecurity and users’ interests.

“We are always friendly toward everyone, but we also have the right to decide and select those who can visit our country. … I hope people coming to the country are our friends, and the real friends.”

The nation’s opening-up policy will not be changed,”but our bottom line is that everyone who comes should abide by Chinese laws,” he said.”We won’t allowanyone to come and enter our market, earn money from consumers, but damage our country.”

Lu highlighted the importance of laws and legal thinking in Internet governance and development, saying that the authorities will issue guidelines to deal with problems in cyberspace.

He said a rule targeting smartphone apps is on the way, following the Fourth Plenary Session of the 18th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China, which ended on Oct 23. The session’s theme was the rule of law.

 

Article source: http://asianewsnetwork.feedsportal.com/c/33359/f/566ᔚ/s/400263f0/sc/1/l/0L0Sasianewsnet0Bnet0Cnews0E667ᖸBhtml/story01.htm

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Anwar tells prosecution to concede defeat

Posted on 31 October 2014 by admin

» Other News

 PUTRAJAYA: Dr Mahathir: Absolute equality between sexes a ‘stupid idea’

 SINGAPORE: Rocket blows up with piece of S’pore research

 SEOUL: S. Korea, Germany to share experience on unification

 BEIJING: No mention of China’s ex-security czar Zhou Yongkang as he is retired, says CCP

� KARACHI: Cyclone Nilofar weakening in Pakistan

 BANGKOK: Thailand sees huge rise in discarded styrofoam

 SINGAPORE: M’sia-S’pore venture exempted from paying development charge on former railway land

 SEOUL: Korean politicians attempt last-minute compromise on Sewol bill

 JAKARTA: The coming of Indonesia’s Fish Lady

JAKARTA: Indonesia’s foreign minister vows to put people first

 BEIJING: Youthful detection no defence against China’s rising breast cancer incidence

● JAKARTA: Andi Widjajanto named as Jokowi Cabinet secretary

 JAKARTA: Jokowi praised for record number of women in cabinet

 SINGAPORE: Thai DPM: Thai people are not that dumb… they would agree

 KUALA LUMPUR: Approval rating of Malaysian PM Najib slips to its lowest-ever: Poll

 

» Most Viewed

 YANGON: Mandalay residents denounce killing of reporter

 MANILA: 9 common scams on social media

 KUALA LUMPUR: Anwar’s daughter makes emotional appeal in YouTube video

 MANILA: SUPERTYPHOON YOLANDA: Aquino signs rehabilitation plan

 DHAKA: Bangladesh tops 32 nations in climate risk chart

 WASHINGTON: Drone issue to be discussed during Pakistan army chief’s US visit

 THATTA: Several thousand fishermen missing at sea off Pakistan

 HONG KONG : HK PROTEST: Politicians see violent end

 BEIJING: 180 economic fugitives back in China to face trial

 TOKYO: Japan to widen trade secret protection

 MANILA: SUPERTYPHOON YOLANDA: 800,000 survivors suffer from mental health problems

 SINGAPORE: M’sia didn’t tell S’pore high-speed rail link project won’t complete by 2020: Ministry

�—Â�SEOUL: New iPhones set to hit Korean shelves

� TOKYO: What does China’s plan for a new infrastructure bank portend for Asia?

 HONG KONG: HK PROTEST: Hong Kong delegate sacked from China’s top political advisory body

 


Article source: http://asianewsnetwork.feedsportal.com/c/33359/f/566602/s/4002338e/sc/1/l/0L0Sasianewsnet0Bnet0Cnews0E667830Bhtml/story01.htm

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Yingluck impeachment proceedings in 25 days, says NLA

Posted on 31 October 2014 by admin

» Other News

 PUTRAJAYA: Dr Mahathir: Absolute equality between sexes a ‘stupid idea’

 SINGAPORE: Rocket blows up with piece of S’pore research

 SEOUL: S. Korea, Germany to share experience on unification

 BEIJING: No mention of China’s ex-security czar Zhou Yongkang as he is retired, says CCP

� KARACHI: Cyclone Nilofar weakening in Pakistan

 BANGKOK: Thailand sees huge rise in discarded styrofoam

 SINGAPORE: M’sia-S’pore venture exempted from paying development charge on former railway land

 SEOUL: Korean politicians attempt last-minute compromise on Sewol bill

 JAKARTA: The coming of Indonesia’s Fish Lady

JAKARTA: Indonesia’s foreign minister vows to put people first

 BEIJING: Youthful detection no defence against China’s rising breast cancer incidence

● JAKARTA: Andi Widjajanto named as Jokowi Cabinet secretary

 JAKARTA: Jokowi praised for record number of women in cabinet

 SINGAPORE: Thai DPM: Thai people are not that dumb… they would agree

 KUALA LUMPUR: Approval rating of Malaysian PM Najib slips to its lowest-ever: Poll

 

» Most Viewed

 YANGON: Mandalay residents denounce killing of reporter

 MANILA: 9 common scams on social media

 KUALA LUMPUR: Anwar’s daughter makes emotional appeal in YouTube video

 MANILA: SUPERTYPHOON YOLANDA: Aquino signs rehabilitation plan

 DHAKA: Bangladesh tops 32 nations in climate risk chart

 WASHINGTON: Drone issue to be discussed during Pakistan army chief’s US visit

 THATTA: Several thousand fishermen missing at sea off Pakistan

 HONG KONG : HK PROTEST: Politicians see violent end

 BEIJING: 180 economic fugitives back in China to face trial

 TOKYO: Japan to widen trade secret protection

 MANILA: SUPERTYPHOON YOLANDA: 800,000 survivors suffer from mental health problems

 SINGAPORE: M’sia didn’t tell S’pore high-speed rail link project won’t complete by 2020: Ministry

�—Â�SEOUL: New iPhones set to hit Korean shelves

� TOKYO: What does China’s plan for a new infrastructure bank portend for Asia?

 HONG KONG: HK PROTEST: Hong Kong delegate sacked from China’s top political advisory body

 


Article source: http://asianewsnetwork.feedsportal.com/c/33359/f/566602/s/40023394/sc/8/l/0L0Sasianewsnet0Bnet0Cnews0E66780A0Bhtml/story01.htm

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Thai DPM: Thai people are not that dumb… they would agree

Posted on 31 October 2014 by admin

Publication Date : 31ᆞ-2014

 

There are certain actions that are taken in the best interests of the nation, and that people will naturally come around to support if a leader explains them properly.

That, in a nutshell, is how Thailand’s deputy prime minister Pridiyathorn Devakula sees his mission now, as he attempts to steer Aseanâ€�s second-largest economy out of the doldrums brought on by seven months of political unrest prior to the May military coup.

Speaking in his hotel suite in Singapore before taking the stage at the Forbes Global CEO Conference on Wednesday, the former central bank governor methodically reels off the strengths of the Thai economy: dynamic entrepreneurs who venture abroad on their own steam, a competitive agricultural sector, as well as a world leader in construction materials and seafood products.

But the economy has at the same time been hobbled by an unwieldy tax system, and energy subsidies which skew consumption and make liquefied petroleum gas about one-third cheaper than that in impoverished neighbouring Laos, he notes.

Energy subsidies need to be cut. And his government – being unelected and dominated by the military – exists to carry out difficult but important tasks like that.

We are here not to be elected. We are here to do the things that elected politicians don’t dare to do,” he declares. In fact, “I know that they (the politicians) would love to have us do it, so that when they come in, they would not have to do it”.

He has nothing against elections, he would say later at the conference, where he would again extol the dynamism of the Thai economy.

“We have to honour (people’s) right of election. I am pretty sure that whoever wins and comes back in the next election, they won’t dare (be that corrupt).”

To be fair, many of the policies put forth by the previous Puea Thai party-run government were “not that bad”. But they were brought down by corruption, he says.

Critics point out that it is a half-truth, that it was Thailand’s royalist elite and middle class who engineered the street protests that paralysed the government for months.

But Pridiyathorn is confident in the supremacy of his logic.

“There is nothing difficult because what we are doing is for the interests of the nation,” he tells me. “You simply have to explain to the people. And the Thai people are not that dumb�€¦ they would agree.”

In the same way, he brushes off recent attempts by a civil society group to get a court injunction against the auction of concessions to explore for oil and gas, which the government says is necessary to secure future supplies.

“This is a silly injunction (attempt) anyway. How could you injunct the thing, which is against the interests of the country?”

The non-governmental organisations, he says, “just bark. Don’t do anything”.

Halfway through the interview, he admonishes me.

“I think you are absorbing a lot of habits of Thai press, the way you ask questions,” he says sternly. “You are not supposed to provoke the one you interview��� okay?”

Later, though, he acknowledges: “If you become a public figure, you must understand that people have the right to criticise you.
“And you have the right to explain to them.”

- See more at: http://www.stasiareport.com/the-big-story/asia-report/blogs/story/thai-people-are-not-dumb-they-would-agree-20141030#sthash.FYfPZYLD.dpuf

 

Article source: http://asianewsnetwork.feedsportal.com/c/33359/f/566602/s/400278d1/sc/7/l/0L0Sasianewsnet0Bnet0Cnews0E667890Bhtml/stor⽅.htm

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No mention of China’s ex-security czar Zhou Yongkang as he is retired, says CCP

Posted on 31 October 2014 by admin

Publication Date : ǿ-10-2014

 

The case of former security czar Zhou Yongkang, who is under probe for graft, did not come up for discussion at a recent Chinese Communist Party (CCP) meeting because he has retired and is no longer part of the central leadership, an official said.

There had been widespread speculation in the media that Zhou’s fate would be known soon, so it caught many by surprise when there was no announcement at the end of the fourth plenum of the Central Committee last week.

“You asked why there was no mention of the Zhou Yongkang case at the fourth plenary session,” Jiang Wei, head of the general office of the CCP’s Central Leading Group for Judicial Reform, told reporters at a briefing on the plenum yesterday.

“That is because Zhou Yongkang no longer serves on the central leadership, so this plenary session did not make a decision on his problem,” he added.

Similarly, a meeting of the CCP disciplinary watchdog ended with no mention of the 71-year-old, who was on the powerful Politburo Standing Committee (PSC).

Ahead of the four-day Central Committee meeting, both Chinese and foreign media had reported that a decision on Zhou would be announced, to underscore president Xi Jinping’s resolve to deepen the rule of law, which was the theme of the plenum.

An Oct 1 commentary in the People’s Daily, the CCP mouthpiece, said a conclusion to investigations should be reached at the plenum, given Zhou’s rank as a former PSC member.

A Reuters report on Oct 16, quoting three unnamed sources, said the disciplinary watchdog would report on the Zhou case at the plenum and that he “looked set to be expelled”, before being handed over for prosecution.

Professor Ren Jianming, an anti-corruption expert at Beihang University, believes the delay could be a result of the probe running into complications, which is not unexpected given Zhou’s support network.

Zhou, the first PSC member to be investigated for graft, controlled China’s vast security apparatus for a decade and was reportedly supported by former president Jiang Zemin and vice-president Zeng Qinghong.

Prof Ren also noted it has been only three months since he was formally placed under investigations on July 29.

Renmin University analyst Zhang Ming said the case is also tricky as it is not purely about economic crimes, but also politics.

Zhou was reportedly plotting a coup with disgraced Chongqing party boss and Politburo member Bo Xilai to oust Xi to prevent him from taking the party’s reins in November 2012.

Bo was convicted and sentenced to life imprisonment last September for bribery, embezzlement and abuse of power.

“The investigators need to conduct investigations and prepare iron-clad evidence against Zhou on two fronts,” said Prof Zhang. “One is on his corrupt activities, which will be made public, and another on his political actions, which will be handled internally.”

Prof Ren believes the CCP will make known disciplinary actions taken against Zhou instead of possibly dealing with him internally, such as putting him under house arrest.

Similarly, Prof Zhang said the wrangle over whether to make Zhou’s case public ended when the Politburo announced he was under investigations in July.

“There is a remote chance of it becoming an internal affair if Zhou’s supporters succeed, but that would expose serious problems in the CCP leadership and against Xi’s authority,” he added.

- See more at: http://www.stasiareport.com/the-big-story/asia-report/china/story/no-mention-chinas-ex-security-czar-zhou-yongkang-fourth-plenum#sthash.uv6yxQʟ.dpuf

 

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