Archive | July, 2015

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MH370: Chinese families want search to continue

Posted on 31 July 2015 by admin

» Other News

 JAKARTA: Police to detain Indonesian ministry official suspected of corruption

 KUALA LUMPUR: New M’sia DPM promises full brunt of law against Sarawak Report editor

 KATHMANDU: Landslides, floods kill 34 in Nepal

 PETALING JAYA: MH3Ȧ: ‘Almost certain’ debris found is of missing plane

 SEOUL: Korean court backs election law on ‘real-name’ online posting

 KHANH HOA: Financial shortfall hinders upgrade of old reservoirs in Vietnam

� MANILA: Philippines to file diplomatic protest vs Canada over trash

 ISLAMABAD: Focus shifts to succession as Taliban admit Omar is dead

 ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s population to exceed 300m by 2050: UN

 TOKYO: Vietnam, Japan foster closer ties

 MOGADISHU: China ‘will not leave’ Somalia despite deadly attack: Ambassador

 BEIJING: China’s defence ministry responds to port speculation

 KUALA LUMPUR: M’sia central banker not under investigation, says police chief

 BEIJING: Spying claims denied by China

● TAIPEI: Taipei colour dust explosion claims 10th life

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» Most Viewed

 BEIJING: Asean, China talk on East Sea

 SEOUL: Korea learns precious lessons from Mers

 TAIPEI: New Taipei to investigate corruption allegations in colour dust explosion

● PESHAWAR: Pakistan health dept fears outbreak of diseases in flood-hit areas

 MANILA: Marcos son ponders if it’s a go in 2016

 BANGKOK: Thais warned to beware of new Copyright Act

 PETALING JAYA: MH370: ‘Almost certain’ debris found is of missing plane

 SHANGHAI: Equities bounce back on signs of stability in Chinese market

 SEOUL: Seoul to launch high-end taxi hailer

�—Â�BEIJING: First rural doctors graduate in China

�Â MANILA: ‘China dredging 10 reefs in disputed waters’

 BEIJING: China-Asean trade negotiations to be concluded by year-end

 SEOUL: Lotte founder descends after 67 years at helm

 KATHMANDU: Nepal Airlines to induct foreign firm as managing partner

● BALIKPAPAN: Drought disrupts movement of staple foods in Indonesia

 


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MH370: Family of passengers thrown into emotional turmoil with latest find

Posted on 31 July 2015 by admin

Publication Date : 31-07-2015

 

A single piece of debris washes ashore half a world away and families of the missing Flight MH370 passengers and crew now find themselves on an emotional roller-coaster all over again.

As authorities work to confirm whether a flaperon found in Reunion Island is that of the ill-fated Boeing-777’s, relatives here say they are grappling with their feelings yet again.

For some, the find could mean closure after over a year of restlessness. For others, confirmation that the piece is part of MH370 would mean the end of all hope of seeing their loved ones again.

When news of the discovery broke, Elaine Chew tossed and turned in her bed on Wednesday night.

The wife of steward Tan Size Hiang found herself distracted at work too yesterday.

“I would fall asleep, then wake up again. I just kept thinking of the plane and Size Hiang.

�€œSometimes, I hope that this is it and at times, I hope that this isn’t the plane,” she said.

Chew said she had become numb to the motions she had gone through several times; whenever a possible discovery was made it was dashed later.

“It’s starting all over again. They would say they found this debris and you begin to hope and then in the end, it didn’t belong to the plane. I don’t know any more. I don’t know what to think,” she said.

Daughter of chief steward Andrew Nari, Maira Elizabeth, chose to shut herself off from the Internet after news of the discovery began trending on Twitter.

“I didn’t want to think about it. I feel nervous, I don’t know what to say about it. We are all a little restless and just waiting to see what it is,” she told The Star.

However, Jacquita Gonzales, the wife of in-flight supervisor Patrick Francis Gomes, was poring over new channels and online websites to seek answers.

“There are so many questions. Why is it there? Why is it so far away from where they are searching? Why now? I am wondering and I have questions but I can only wait. It’s just sickening,” she said.

“I would be happy if we have some sort of closure, until we can bring Patrick back and let him rest in peace. But another part of me says no.

“There’s still hope. I still want him to be alive. I’m torn.”

Grace Subathirai Nathan, whose mother Anne Daisy was on board the ill-fated flight, said it was the start of another painful waiting game but she kept her hopes alive.

“As usual, it’s another painful waiting game for the family members. Until there is irrefutable evidence, we will continue to hold out hope,” she said.

Security guard Subramaniam Gurusamy thinks his family will get some sort of closure if the recovered flaperon is indeed MH370’s.

“It has been a long, painful experience in not really knowing if your loved one is alive or dead,” said the 61-year-old whose only son Puspa­nathan was onboard the MAS flight.

A Petronas employee, Puspanat­han, 34, boarded the aircraft for a business trip to China. He is married and has two sons, aged two and four.

According to Subramaniam, his wife A. Amirtham, also 61, started crying when she heard about the discovery at Reunion Island.

“She watched the news on television and started to cry even more.”

 

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M’sia’s AGC denies drafting charge sheet against Najib

Posted on 31 July 2015 by admin

» Other News

 JAKARTA: Police to detain Indonesian ministry official suspected of corruption

 KUALA LUMPUR: New M’sia DPM promises full brunt of law against Sarawak Report editor

 KATHMANDU: Landslides, floods kill 34 in Nepal

 PETALING JAYA: MH370: ‘Almost certain’ debris found is of missing plane

 SEOUL: Korean court backs election law on ‘real-name’ online posting

 KHANH HOA: Financial shortfall hinders upgrade of old reservoirs in Vietnam

 MANILA: Philippines to file diplomatic protest vs Canada over trash

 ISLAMABAD: Focus shifts to succession as Taliban admit Omar is dead

 ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s population to exceed 300m by 2050: UN

 TOKYO: Vietnam, Japan foster closer ties

 MOGADISHU: China ‘will not leave’ Somalia despite deadly attack: Ambassador

 BEIJING: China’s defence ministry responds to port speculation

 KUALA LUMPUR: M’sia central banker not under investigation, says police chief

 BEIJING: Spying claims denied by China

 TAIPEI: Taipei colour dust explosion claims 10th life

 

» Most Viewed

 BEIJING: Asean, China talk on East Sea

 SEOUL: Korea learns precious lessons from Mers

 TAIPEI: New Taipei to investigate corruption allegations in colour dust explosion

 PESHAWAR: Pakistan health dept fears outbreak of diseases in flood-hit areas

 MANILA: Marcos son ponders if it’s a go in 2016

 BANGKOK: Thais warned to beware of new Copyright Act

 PETALING JAYA: MH370: ‘Almost certain’ debris found is of missing plane

 SHANGHAI: Equities bounce back on signs of stability in Chinese market

 SEOUL: Seoul to launch high-end taxi hailer

 BEIJING: First rural doctors graduate in China

 MANILA: �˜China dredging 10 reefs in disputed waters’

 BEIJING: China-Asean trade negotiations to be concluded by year-end

 SEOUL: Lotte founder descends after ȣ years at helm

 KATHMANDU: Nepal Airlines to induct foreign firm as managing partner

 BALIKPAPAN: Drought disrupts movement of staple foods in Indonesia

 


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Taiwan students protest over suicide of activist

Posted on 31 July 2015 by admin

Publication Date : ǿ-07-2015

 

About 300 students of anti-curriculum guidelines revision groups scaled the fence of the Legislative Yuan yesterday and gathered at its front gate to protest the death of their member Lin Kuan-hua who committed suicide yesterday in New Taipei City.

Student activist Lin Kuan-hua, who was arrested last week for his role in a 33-person storming of the Ministry of Education (MOE), was found dead in his family residence after committing suicide yesterday in New Taipei.

Lin, who would have marked his 20th birthday yesterday, was active in student protests against high school curriculum guideline changes which have stirred controversy over the island’s history.

The cause of Lin’s death was attributed to the burning of coal inside his room.

Lin’s parents said that their son’s suicide had nothing to do with his activism against the curriculum guidelines, and that he had struggled with depression.

Lin, who once attended Juang Jing Vocational High School had taken time off from his studies in June to participate in the student movement, serving as a spokesman representing Northern Taiwan high school students.

Minister of Education Wu Se-hwa, under pressure from opposition party leaders to show leniency against students involved in the protest, stated in an afternoon news conference that he was “willing to take full responsibility” on the matter.

He was heckled by students as he made his way to pay respects to the Lin family, and said to reporters afterwards that his heart was “full of guilt.”

The minister added that since textbooks adhering to both the old and new guidelines are available for use, it implied that the old curriculum standards were still in effect.

“The MOE has never interfered with the decision of teachers on which textbooks to use,” Wu said.

We need peace: Lin’s mother

Lin’s mother said that the family had planned to celebrate their son’s birthday yesterday.

She thanked the support given by Juang Jing school officials, which had provided counseling to the younger Lin over issues relating to depression.

She urged the public not to use the suicide of Lin Kuan-hua as a way to start “inappropriate discussions” and that his death is not linked to pressure from the school, teachers and other education authorities.

A transcript of Lin’s exchanges with fellow students on the chat client Line indicated that the protest leader had planned the event for his birthday, in which he wrote: “there are some things one must do without saying what.”

He also added that he wanted to “ignite the media and commentary” on July 30.

Expedite communication: President Ma

Responding to Lin’s death yesterday, President Ma Ying-jeou said the incident had brought him “deep pain,” as he urged the MOE to expedite an exchange of opinions with those protesting the curriculum guideline changes.

He added that dialogue should take into consideration the nation’s constitutional framework.

The president also cancelled a planned appearance at a film screening of “Where the Wind Settles”, highlighting the role of veterans set in postwar Taiwan.

Parties trade barbs on responsibility

Kuomintang (KMT) and Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) presidential candidates both voiced their regret over Lin’s suicide yesterday.

DPP chairwoman Tsai Ing-wen said that it was “disappointing” that the government was “still refusing to take a proactive response” regarding the situation.

KMT presidential candidate Hung Hsiu-chu urged politicians to exercise compassion and refrain from political manipulation which lead to “confusion” on the part of students.

While the DPP criticised the government and urged the reversal of the curriculum guidelines, it accused the KMT of using the tragedy for political gain.

The KMT in a press release accused the DPP of “fanning flames” leading up to Lin’s death.

 

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Growing protectionism hurting Indonesia: Study

Posted on 31 July 2015 by admin

Publication Date : 31-07-2015

 

A report by two leading Indonesian researchers argues that growing protectionism by Indonesia President Joko Widodo’s government is damaging an economy already growing at its slowest pace for the past five years.

The study, sponsored by the respected Lowy Institute in Australia, says new restrictions on foreign investment and trade will “drive up prices for Indonesian consumers at a time when their purchasing power is declining, and undermine the competitiveness and productivity of Indonesian firms”.

Dr Sjamsu Rahardja and Dr Arianto Patunru, based at the World Bank and Australian National University respectively, say that former Indonesian finance minister Muhamad Chatib Basri’s old adage that “the good times make for bad policy and the bad times make for good policy” has been turned on its head by Joko’s government.

In this case, “the bad times make for bad policy”, they wrote.

The report comes two days after Joko’s trip to Singapore where he wooed foreign investors, saying that Indonesia needs foreign investment and that the best time to invest is now.

But economists are less impressed, pointing out that what is said to investors often clashes with what is practised.

The report, which tracked Indonesia’s major economic policies from the 1960s until now, noted that while the country had entered into free-trade agreements with Asean nations and other major trading partners, it had also unveiled a raft of protectionist measures over the years.

This year, Indonesia’s Manpower Ministry imposed restrictions on the use of foreign professionals and Cabinet ministers talk openly about resisting the implementation of Asean Economic Community (AEC) reforms, with months to go before the AEC takes effect early next year, it noted.

Among the measures are requirements for a higher percentage of local content in exports and the raising of import tariffs on a raft of products earlier this month.

The use of non-tariff measures has also increased, the researchers said, citing the international Global Trade Alert report that ranked Indonesia among the worst offenders for increasing protection since the global financial crisis.

It said Indonesia has introduced 37 “amber” measures and 158 “red” measures since 2009, leading to 756 tariff lines across 45 sectors and affecting 181 trading partners. “Red” refers to harmful measures.

“A more restrictive import regime could add to already rising market concerns over economic nationalism, while protectionism will only likely worsen the deterioration in competitiveness in key industries, including manufacturing, and introduce more distortions and inefficiencies,” read an excerpt of a Nomura report released this week.

Joko told The Straits Times in an interview on Sunday that he was aware of these accusations of Indonesia looking inwards, but he said raising tariffs does not conflict with seeking foreign investments.

“I do not think the two are contradictory. We must work to balance the two… and I am sure foreign investment can and must strengthen local industry as well,” he said.

Economists are unconvinced.

“Rather than pursuing interventionist policies, the Indonesian government needs to return to the basics: infrastructure, logistics and consistency of rules and regulations. Unfortunately, for the immediate future that seems very unlikely,” the authors of the Lowy Institute report noted.

See more at:� http://www.straitstimes.com/asia/se-asia/growing-protectionism-hurting-indonesia-study

 

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M’sia central banker not under investigation, says police chief

Posted on 31 July 2015 by admin

Publication Date : 31-07-2015

 

Malaysia police chief Khalid Abu Bakar has dismissed rumours that central bank governor Zeti Akhtar Aziz is being investigated in connection with the 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB) saga, clearing the air amid speculation about her in the past few days.

His comments yesterday came as Bank Negara denied rumours that  Zeti had resigned and that she had suffered a heart attack.

Khalid, when asked whether she was being investigated as alleged in several Internet blogs, replied: “Not by us.”

Speaking to reporters after an event, Khalid added: “Who says police are investigating? To my knowledge, there is no investigation.”

The widely respected central banker is one of the four heads of a special task force tasked with probing theŁMDB scandal.

The so-called “task force of the four Tan Sris” consists of Dr Zeti, Khalid, the Attorney-General, and head of the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission Kassim Mohamad.

The new Attorney-General is Mohamed Apandi Ali, who replaced Abdul Gani Patail on Tuesday.

The rumours about Dr Zeti reflected the deep angst faced by the government as the case has taken many twists and turns, including speculation that members of the task force had been leaking information about the 1MDB probe to the media.

Bank Negara on July 12 denied allegations that its staff were involved in the leaks.

Yesterday, it dismissed rumours circulating in local media and financial markets that Dr Zeti had resigned.

“This is not true,” said a central bank spokesman.

When contacted by The Star, a spokesman also denied that Dr Zeti had suffered a heart attack.

“She is fine and came to work as usual,” the spokesman added.

Dr Zeti, 67, has helmed the central bank since 2000, and served under former premiers Mahathir Mohamad and Abdullah Badawi.

A PhD holder in monetary and international economics from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, Dr Zeti was credited by financial experts worldwide for managing Malaysia’s economy during two financial crises in 1998 and 20Ǩ.

 

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Spying claims denied by China

Posted on 31 July 2015 by admin

Publication Date : 31-07-2015

 

Allegations of economic espionage leveled by the United States against Chinese universities and government-backed companies are completely groundless, the Foreign Ministry said on Thursday.

It was commenting after a Chinese college professor facing spying charges in the US was granted bail.

Zhang Hao, a Tianjin University professor specialising in acoustics, was arrested in May after arriving at Los Angeles International Airport to speak at a conference.

Insiders said Zhang is in good physical condition and will stay at a friend’s house in an arrangement that has been approved by a court, but will not be allowed to leave Northern California.

Experts said Zhang’s bail agreement indicates a softening of the US stance ahead of President Xi Jinping’s state visit to the country in September.

Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei denied that Chinese government-backed companies were carrying out industrial espionage.

He called for the US to stop the “irresponsible and groundless accusations”, and instead help to boost Sino-US ties.

Zhang, 36, is accused of stealing sensitive information about acoustic technology from his former US employer, Skyworks Solutions, in Massachusetts to help Chinese universities and government-backed companies.

Two other professors from the university and three other Chinese citizens are also facing similar charges, but they are in China and have not been arrested.

The controversial technology, usually used in smartphones and tablets to filter signals intended for the user, also has military applications.

Apart from his university work, Zhang also runs a company that makes equipment using this technology.

In an open letter in May, Fan Liping, Zhang’s wife, insisted that her husband is innocent, and described him as a research fellow with a withdrawn nature who has “worked intensively for scientific achievements”.

Zhang was granted bail after the US Federal Bureau of Investigation alleged that the Chinese government was behind the majority of economic espionage cases aimed at US companies.

Wang Hongwei, a national security professor at Renmin University of China, said he sees Zhang’s bail as a softening of the US position.

“US politicians are good at taking the neutral course – avoiding angering voters in favour or against China,” he said.

Wang said most of the US charges brought against Chinese intellectuals in espionage cases are groundless and an overreaction to China’s rising economic and political clout.

Lei Ming, a media officer at Tianjin University, said the institution will work with Zhang’s attorneys to safeguard his rights.

Zhang Min in Tianjin contributed to this story.

 

 

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Taipei colour dust explosion claims 10th life

Posted on 31 July 2015 by admin

Publication Date : 31-07-썟

 

A 31-year-old woman surnamed Kuo, a victim of the Formosa Water Park explosions, was taken off a ventilator and pronounced dead at Tainan’s Chi Mei Medical Centre at 7:06 pm, yesterday.

Kuo was the 10th person to perish due to the tragic accident that occurred a month ago.

According to local media, Kuo was hospitalised at Chi Mei Hospital on June 28, two days after the explosion.

She suffered from second- and third-degree burns, which covered around 50 per cent of her body. Her injuries were mainly concentrated on her limbs and head.

Kuo underwent several operations during her stay in the hospital, including three procedures to remove dead or infected tissue, skin transplants and fasciotomy — an emergency treatment to release pressure in affected limbs.

Four medical staff from the hospital’s burn center were responsible for changing Kuo’s burn dressings as well as conducting follow-up examinations.

Tainan mayor Lai Ching-te also visited the hospital on several occasions to give Kuo support.

However, Kuo had been unconscious after multiple treatments and suffered from severe infections that, along with multiple organ failure, led to her death.

Her family agreed with doctors that her life support should be removed.

Kuo worked as an administrator in a real-estate agency and planned to embark on a working holiday to Australia this year, according to local media.

Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou announced yesterday at a press conference that the hospital has handled 59 burn patients since the water park explosion and, so far, 22 patients have been discharged.

Currently, there are still 37 people hospitalised, 22 of them in severe condition and still receiving therapy in the hospital’s burn center, butಏ of them have been moved to general treatment areas.

Doctors from the hospital are reminding patients that have already been discharged to continue with necessary rehabilitation, wound care and psychological therapy.

After patients are discharged from the hospital, the journey for victims becomes more challenging and support from family, friends and society becomes highly important when adapting to re-entering society.

 

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Police to detain Indonesian ministry official suspected of corruption

Posted on 31 July 2015 by admin

» Other News

 KUALA LUMPUR: New M’sia DPM promises full brunt of law against Sarawak Report editor

 KATHMANDU: Landslides, floods kill 34 in Nepal

 PETALING JAYA: MH370: ‘Almost certain’ debris found is of missing plane

 SEOUL: Korean court backs election law on ‘real-name’ online posting

 KHANH HOA: Financial shortfall hinders upgrade of old reservoirs in Vietnam

 MANILA: Philippines to file diplomatic protest vs Canada over trash

 ISLAMABAD: Focus shifts to succession as Taliban admit Omar is dead

 ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s population to exceed 300m by 2050: UN

 TOKYO: Vietnam, Japan foster closer ties

�—Â�MOGADISHU: China ‘will not leave’ Somalia despite deadly attack: Ambassador

�—Â�BEIJING: China’s defence ministry responds to port speculation

â—� KUALA LUMPUR: M’sia central banker not under investigation, says police chief

 BEIJING: Spying claims denied by China

 TAIPEI: Taipei colour dust explosion claims 10th life

 

» Most Viewed

 BEIJING: Asean, China talk on East Sea

 SEOUL: Korea learns precious lessons from Mers

 TAIPEI: New Taipei to investigate corruption allegations in colour dust explosion

 PESHAWAR: Pakistan health dept fears outbreak of diseases in flood-hit areas

 MANILA: Marcos son ponders if it’s a go in 2016

 BANGKOK: Thais warned to beware of new Copyright Act

 PETALING JAYA: MH370: ‘Almost certain’ debris found is of missing plane

 SHANGHAI: Equities bounce back on signs of stability in Chinese market

 SEOUL: Seoul to launch high-end taxi hailer

 BEIJING: First rural doctors graduate in China

 MANILA: ‘China dredging 10 reefs in disputed waters’

 BEIJING: China-Asean trade negotiations to be concluded by year-end

 SEOUL: Lotte founder descends after 67 years at helm

 KATHMANDU: Nepal Airlines to induct foreign firm as managing partner

BALIKPAPAN: Drought disrupts movement of staple foods in Indonesia

 


Article source: http://asianewsnetwork.feedsportal.com/c/33359/f/566602/s/4897627e/sc/24/l/0L0Sasianewsnet0Bnet0Cnews0E788950Bhtml/story01.htm

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New M’sia DPM promises full brunt of law against Sarawak Report editor

Posted on 31 July 2015 by admin

» Other News

 JAKARTA: Police to detain Indonesian ministry official suspected of corruption

 KATHMANDU: Landslides, floods kill 34 in Nepal

� PETALING JAYA: MH370: ‘Almost certain’ debris found is of missing plane

 SEOUL: Korean court backs election law on ‘real-name’ online posting

 KHANH HOA: Financial shortfall hinders upgrade of old reservoirs in Vietnam

 MANILA: Philippines to file diplomatic protest vs Canada over trash

 ISLAMABAD: Focus shifts to succession as Taliban admit Omar is dead

● ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s population to exceed 300m by 2050: UN

 TOKYO: Vietnam, Japan foster closer ties

 MOGADISHU: China ‘will not leave’ Somalia despite deadly attack: Ambassador

 BEIJING: China’s defence ministry responds to port speculation

 KUALA LUMPUR: M’sia central banker not under investigation, says police chief

 BEIJING: Spying claims denied by China

 TAIPEI: Taipei colour dust explosion claims 10th life

 

» Most Viewed

 BEIJING: Asean, China talk on East Sea

 SEOUL: Korea learns precious lessons from Mers

 TAIPEI: New Taipei to investigate corruption allegations in colour dust explosion

 PESHAWAR: Pakistan health dept fears outbreak of diseases in flood-hit areas

 MANILA: Marcos son ponders if it’s a go in 2016

 BANGKOK: Thais warned to beware of new Copyright Act

â—� PETALING JAYA: MH370: ‘Almost certain’ debris found is of missing plane

 SHANGHAI: Equities bounce back on signs of stability in Chinese market

 SEOUL: Seoul to launch high-end taxi hailer

 BEIJING: First rural doctors graduate in China

 MANILA: ‘China dredging 10 reefs in disputed waters’

 BEIJING: China-Asean trade negotiations to be concluded by year-end

 SEOUL: Lotte founder descends after 67 years at helm

� KATHMANDU: Nepal Airlines to induct foreign firm as managing partner

 BALIKPAPAN: Drought disrupts movement of staple foods in Indonesia

 


Article source: http://asianewsnetwork.feedsportal.com/c/33359/f/566602/s/4897627f/sc/7/l/0L0Sasianewsnet0Bnet0Cnews0E788940Bhtml/story01.htm

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