Archive | December, 2015

Tags: ,

10 Most Over-the-Top Cruise-Ship Suites

Posted on 31 December 2015 by admin

December 30, 2015 at 9:00:00 AM EST | Post a Comment


Glass-walled showers that extend out from the ship, private deck whirlpools, and unlimited in-suite spa services—living the high life on the high seas has its perks. With an ever-rising demand for luxe experiences aboard the world’s finest cruise ships, cruise lines have made an art of amenities. White gloves open doors to top-level suites with limitless views and impeccable interiors that are certain to impress. If you’re one of the few lucky ones staying in these sumptuous suites, there’s a glass of bubbly ready for you upon arrival, perfect for a toast as the butler unpacks your belongings. —Zachary Laks

Member Comments (0)

Sign in to leave a comment

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/fodors/travel-news/~3/nvOce5Hx174/10-most-over-the-top-cruise-ship-suites

Comments (0)

Tags: ,

Plenty of cycling in 2016

Posted on 31 December 2015 by admin

Sky Lane PHOTO: Somchai Poomlard

After six months or so of closure, the revamped cycling track around Suvarnabhumi International Airport was officially reopened last Saturday. Renamed the “Sky Lane”, this collaboration between the Airport of Thailand (AOT) and Siam Commercial Bank (SCB) has been greatly welcomed by Bangkok’s cycling community. The return of this bike track to the short list of places where residents of the capital can train or enjoy leisurely rides without the risk of becoming roadkill is definitely one of this year’s best bit of good news.

Unlike the old version, which was popularly called sanam khieo (Green Track) because of the colour of its surface, the 23km-long Sky Lane has been repaved with bright blue-tainted asphalt that reduces rolling resistance, thus allowing cyclists to go faster. The speed limit is 40kph. Rider traffic now flows in a counter-clockwise direction.

Facilities have been improved and added. Along the course, four rest areas, each complete with separate toilets for men and women, have been provided. A solar-powered lighting system, once the installation is completed, will make it possible for cyclists to ride after night falls.

The most important thing riders who have not yet visited the Sky Lane must know is that, apart from a bike and a cycling helmet, you must also have the “Snap” bracelet which uses RFID (radio frequency identification) technology to let you enter and exit the track. It is said that in the future Snap will also serve as an e-wallet so riders can buy drinks and snacks, soon to be available in the service area, without having to carry money.

Snap can be conveniently obtained at the entrance, free of charge. Thais holding “smart” ID cards can get the bracelets from automatic machines, while those with older versions and foreigners with passports can just go the registration area to get one.

Co-ordinates: 13°42’39.17″ N 100°46’32.36″ E

Opening hours: Currently from 6am to 6pm, daily. Will be extended to 10pm, once the lighting is all set.

Fee: None.

If the Sky Lane is too far from your home, the following are some of the places in Bangkok you can cycle without encountering danger from vehicles.

Benjakitti Park

This beautiful public park in the heart of the city, a few minutes’ walk from Asoke BTS station and Queen Sirikit National Convention Center MRT station, has separate lanes for cyclists and joggers. The well-paved track, which runs around a lake, is about 2km long. Rental bikes are available.

Co-ordinates: 13°43’32.73″ N 100°33’27.98″ E

Opening hours: Daily, 4.30am-9pm

Fee: None

Bung Makham Thet

Benjakitti Park

This public park, officially named Wari Phirom Park, in Soi Pracha Ruamchai 47, Min Buri, boasts ań.6km cycle lane circling two connecting lakes, Bung Makham Thet and Bung Sakae Ngam Sam Duen. A standard BMX racing track, the first in Bangkok, is being built here, and should be completed soon. Rental bikes are available.

Co-ordinates: 13°50’52.78″ N 100°46’32.54″ E

Opening hours: Daily, 6am-6pm

Fee: None

Peppermint Bike Park

This privately run park has both a lane and elevated wooden bridge with different types of turns and rollers, plus a drop-off, for riders to exercise and practice their skills. The park is located in Soi Yothin Phattana 3. Rental bikes and helmets are available.

Co-ordinates: 13°49’01.85″ N 100°37’45.76″ E

Opening hours: Tuesday-Friday, 4pm-10pm Saturday and Sunday, 7am-10 pm

Fee: 200 baht

Bung Rapnam Nong Bon

Located in Soi 43 off Chalerm Phrakiat Road, near the famous Rama 9 Park, this park surrounding an S-shaped lake serves as a good place for leisurely riding. The cycle route is 2km long.

Co-ordinates: 13°41’29.52″ N 100°39’49.89″ E

Opening hours: Daily, 6am-6.30pm

Fee: None

Club11

This 3.5km mountain bike single track, located within the 11th Infantry Regiment in Bang Khen, is the only one of its kind in Bangkok. It’s a fun trail with technical sections. The tree cover allows bikers to enjoy riding without getting burnt by the sun.

Co-ordinates: 13°51’21.13″ N 100°35’44.61″ E

Opening hours: Daily, 9am-6pm

Fee: 100 baht

Phutthamonthon

Situated right on the edge of Bangkok’s western boundary, this Buddhist park technically belongs to Nakhon Pathom. Still, it’s convenient to get to for Bangkokians living in that part of the city. Bikes can be ridden along the park roads and a short single track in the northern part of the park.

Co-ordinates: 13°47’00.17″ N 100°19’05.33″

Opening hours: Daily, 5am-7pm

Fee: None

Apart from those mentioned, there are also other places such as the BMX park at Hua Mak Stadium, Rodfai Park in Chatuchak and the bike lane underneath the Si Rat Expressway (the section between Ngam Wong Wan and Chaeng Wattana roads).

No matter where you ride, keep in mind that it is important to respect the rules and rights of others.

Well, see you here again next Thursday. Until then, if you have questions, news or biking insights you wish to share, please feel free to send an email to pongpetm@bangkokpost.co.th or go to Freewheel Bangkok communitypage on Facebook.


Pongpet Mekloy is the Bangkok Post’s travel editor and a mountain bike freak.

Club11

Peppermint Park Photo: NAPHONGTHAWAT HIRANWAN

Article source: http://feeds.bangkokpost.com/c/33101/f/535956/s/4c8efc6b/sc/13/l/0L0Sbangkokpost0N0Ctravel0Cin0Ethailand0C812움Cplenty0Eof0Ecycling0Ein0E20A16/story01.htm

Comments (0)

Tags: ,

A whale and a calf of a time

Posted on 31 December 2015 by admin

At the top of any list of things to do in Tonga should be swimming with a humpback whale and her calf. Of course, every swim is different. Some mothers may not feel comfortable having humans swim with her baby. Interestingly, some mothers, as I was lucky enough to experience, may welcome the prospect of having a bit of rest as she watches her baby swim with new “playmates”. It is humbling to see how small we are compared to these giants. I was beyond fascinated watching the truck-sized mother affectionately comfort her baby with her humongous body. Sometimes they sang to each other, which sounded like one of most peculiar languages I have ever heard. Sometimes, a curious baby whale swam very close to check us out before moving away to join its mother. The best moment was when the mother surfaced and slowed down enough to allow us to swim alongside her and her baby. It seemed like my lucky day when I found myself surrounded by three humpback whales: a mother, her calf and an adult escort. The mother and her calf suddenly swam away. But the escort swam close towards us, perhaps too close. My excitement was quickly replaced with panic when its gigantic tail nearly hit us, missing by only a metre. Cloudy water bubbled everywhere. The force blew us away many metres in the water. Fortunately, he disappeared afterwards.

We humans have unusual dreams. Some of us are too embarrassed to tell others. A few of us crazily decide to follow them and I was one of those people. In early September, I followed my unusual dream to the Kingdom of Tonga on a quest to swim with humpback whales, the gigantic, highly intelligent creatures.

Tonga, a Polynesian kingdom, is interestingly located right next to the International Date Line, northeast from New Zealand. Although it is not well known among Thais, its beaches and scenic areas are truly one of the world’s hidden gems. Tongans are the nicest of people and they possess unique craftsmanship skills that people around the world should be talking about. Anyway, the real highlight of a visit to Tonga are no doubt the majestic humpback whales.

Tonga’s water around its Vava’u and Ha’apai islands has been a breeding and nursing sanctuary for the migrating humpback whales from Antarctica for as long as Tongans can remember. Every year from June to October (the Southern Hemisphere’s winter), Tonga’s islands become crowded not only by whales, but also by tourists who “migrate” from all over the world to get a rare chance to swim with these oceanic beasts.

Swimming with whales in Tonga is not a piece of cake. During my seven days out in the cold Pacific waters, there were times when I was soaked and shivering to death because of unexpected windy tropical storms. There were moments that I had to swim for hundreds of metres before getting close to the whales, only to get the so-called lethal “whale slapping”. Worst of all, there were days when we waited in the water and the whales were nowhere to be seen.

With all the torment and difficulties, this was still one of the most memorable of experiences of my life. I feel privileged to have got the rare chance to look into the eyes of one of the smartest living creatures on Earth as we begged her to trust us to be around her offspring.

Then I was blessed with a miracle interaction with the world’s cutest and greatest baby, as I was swimming “fin to fin” with him, watching his wonderful underwater acrobatic moves, listening to the songs made by his mother and mesmerised by his stunning water bubble tricks. This real-life dream ended with the mother joining us for a swim, exhibiting a fondness for her baby. She took a glimpse at us as this marked their farewell before they both disappeared into the deep blue water.

Flying to Tonga from Thailand is not difficult. You can take a Ǫ hour flight from Bangkok to Auckland, New Zealand, and then take Air New Zealand’s daily flight for another 3-4 hours to reach Tonga’s capital city, Nuku’alofa. You can also fly to Tonga via Sydney by Virgin Australia’s weekly flight.

To go from the capital city to Ha’apai or Vava’u islands, where most humpback mothers and calves are found, you can take one of the several domestic flights available from the capital. Be careful, as Tongan domestic flights have a reputation for being unpredictable. Flights are often delayed or cancelled. Even worse, some find their seats have been given away to other passengers if they do not arrive before others.

It is wise to pick a good operator months before arriving Tonga. Most of the reliable operators can be fully occupied, leaving you with all the inferior ones, so always plan ahead.

Not every day in the water was a lucky day. There were a few days when we got in the water and the whales, not being in the mood, disappeared right away. On those unlucky days, we spent most of our time on the boat.

On my last day, we ran into a very cheerful calf with his super relaxed mother. We called the calf Snowy because of some of the white parts on his body. While his mum was resting below, Snowy became extremely playful, inspecting each of us closely. At one point, we had to move back from the baby because he was flapping his fins and tail too rapidly in excitement. I don’t think he realised how powerful his body was compared to us. Snowy was obviously showing off all of his skills, from ascending to the surface of the water upside down to breaching. I watched him breach and land back in the water just a few meters from me.

The Talangala Eco Resort made my Tonga trip unlike any other. The owners deserve a big round of applause for making the resort sustainable as they have completely minimised the resort’s water usage and furthermore fuel its light and electricity with only solar power. For 10 days, I stayed in a tent, drank naturally tasty rain water, watched million-dollar sunsets, walked back to my tent every night under a starry sky and woke up to seeing whales breaching every morning.

The port of entry to Tonga is its capital city, Nuku’alofa, located on the island of Tongatapu. Although the city is small, I decided to take a taxi to visit the unique royal palace at the city centre. On the way, my taxi passed through many cemeteries, all were brightly colourful enough for me to beg the driver to stop so I could take pictures.

The small island of Uoleva, where we stayed, is no doubt surrounded by plenty of humpback whales. We nonetheless had several encounters with some other interesting creature on land. Juanita and Echo, the island’s dogs, made our stay even more charming. They sent us to the sea and welcomed us back onto the beach every day. Just metres away from my tent, a stunning bright blue king fisher was not so camera-shy. On the way to the restaurant, the biggest spider I’ve ever seen was weaving its web for dinner. Watching the progress of this kept me in awe for quite some time.

The food and desserts on Ha’apai Island were just wonderful. Some of the ingredients were grown fresh right behind the restaurant. Every day, we only talked about three things on the boat: the whales, the food and the dessert. My favourites were the fresh papaya and lemon breakfast, and dinners that included black fin tuna and chicken kebab, which was by far the best I’ve ever had.

Article source: http://feeds.bangkokpost.com/c/33101/f/535956/s/4c8efc6c/sc/27/l/0L0Sbangkokpos҈N0Ctravel0Ctourists0Eand0Eexpats0C8123720Ca0Ewhale0Eand0Ea0Ecalf0Eof0Ea0Etime/story01.htm

Comments (0)

Tags: ,

10 Can’t-Miss Attractions at Walt Disney World

Posted on 30 December 2015 by admin

December 29, 2015 at 9:00:00 AM EST | Post a Comment


In a category of its own, Walt Disney World Orlando lives up to its self-proclaimed title as â€�The happiest place on earth.” A magical empire that has expanded to cover 43 square-miles of Central Florida, Disney pioneered the modern theme park, with immersive attractions tied in to silver-screen favorites and thrills for all ages. With upwards of 52 million visitors annually and well over a hundred attractions offered throughout the four theme parks, Walt Disney World still has several can’t-miss attractions. From a thrilling trip on the world’s most expensive roller coaster to the park’s original slow rides that forever capture the spirit of Disney, there�€™s no restraint on the magic of these attractions. �€”Zachary Laks

Member Comments (0)

Sign in to leave a comment

Article source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/fodors/travel-news/~3/VfTyjY0kgN4/10-cant-miss-attractions-at-walt-disney-world

Comments (0)

Tags: ,

Pumping more money into schools is no panacea

Posted on 30 December 2015 by admin

Japan spends only 3.5 percent of its gross domestic product on education, which is below the OECD average of 4.7 percent. As a result, it has the third-largest class size, pays teacher salaries that have not kept up with inflation between 2008 and 2013, and provides 20 days of training for high school teachers compared with 70 to 120 days in half of other OECD countries. Early childhood education also suffers, with only 30 percent of children in publicly funded schools. That compares with the OECD average of 68.4 percent.

Yet despite these factors, Japanese students continue to excel on tests compared with their peers in other nations. For example, on the 2012 Program for International Student Assessment, Japanese students ranked second in math and first in reading and science. Moreover, students distinguished themselves in problem-solving skills, which are considered indispensable for success in the global economy.

If educational spending is indeed the key to student performance, how do we explain these results?

The situation in the U.S. is the flip side of the coin. The U.S. spent $12,608 per student in 2010 – more than double in inflation-adjusted dollars than it spent in 1970. That puts the U.S. on a par with the OECD average expressed as a percentage of gross domestic product. Yet despite these increases in funding, its students performed below average in math on the 2012 Program for International Student Assessment, and about average in reading and science. Moreover, its adjusted state SAT scores showed little improvement since the 1970s.

A woman was arrested Tuesday on suspicion of damaging a corpse and abandoning it after a human skull and body parts were found in a condominium in Osaka Prefecture. (Japan Times) Police are looking for the benevolent owner of 2,000 lottery tickets that were presumably left intentionally at the Tochigi City Hall in Ibaraki Prefecture. (Japan Today) For Mohammed, the perils of staying in Damascus crystalized when a sniper’s bullet whizzed past his head while he and his cousins were on his rooftop, watching the Syrian air force bomb rebel forces. (Japan Today) Japanese prosecutors on Monday charged a South Korean two weeks after he was arrested for alleged illegal entry into the controversial Yasukuni shrine before it was hit by a small explosion, local media reported. (Japan Today) Police in Yokohama said Monday they have arrested a 42-year-old man on suspicion of attempting to murder his 6-year-old son. (Japan Today)
Spending more money on public schools has long been the conventional way to try to improve student performance. Countries that allocate less than the average OECD expenditure expressed as a percentage of their gross domestic product are criticized for shortchanging students. But Japan and the United States illustrate that the preoccupation with spending is a distraction from a more fundamental issue. (Japan Times) Japanese macaque monkeys that bathe and relax in hot springs at the Jigokudani Yaen-Koen park in central Japan are drawing the attention of foreign travelers. (Jiji Press) The foreign ministers of South Korea and Japan on Monday reached a deal meant to resolve a decades-long impasse over Korean women forced into Japanese military-run brothels during World War II, an important breakthrough for the Northeast Asian powers. (Japan Today) Tokyo Metropolitan Police arrested a 24-year-old male company employee for smearing his own excrement on a girl in Mitaka City, reports TV Asahi (Dec. 27). (Tokyo Reporter) A teenager from Kimitsu, Chiba Prefecture, under arrest after allegedly killing his grandparents said he was ready to kill anyone but picked family members because someone else might run away, police said Monday. (Japan Times)


Article source: http://newsonjapan.com/html/newsdesk/article/114784.php

Comments (0)

Tags: ,

42-year-old man arrested for attempting to strangle 6-year-old son to death

Posted on 30 December 2015 by admin

Shunsuke Okudera, an office employee, is suspected of attempting to strangle his son to death at their home at around 11 p.m. on Sunday, Fuji TV reported.

Okudera’s mother, who lives with them, called 110 reporting her grandson had been strangled by her son. When police arrived at the residence, the son was lying on the floor in the living room. Okudera admitted to the charge and was arrested at the scene.

Police said the boy is in a coma.

A woman was arrested Tuesday on suspicion of damaging a corpse and abandoning it after a human skull and body parts were found in a condominium in Osaka Prefecture. (Japan Times) Police are looking for the benevolent owner of 2ꯠ lottery tickets that were presumably left intentionally at the Tochigi City Hall in Ibaraki Prefecture. (Japan Today) For Mohammed, the perils of staying in Damascus crystalized when a sniper’s bullet whizzed past his head while he and his cousins were on his rooftop, watching the Syrian air force bomb rebel forces. (Japan Today) Japanese prosecutors on Monday charged a South Korean two weeks after he was arrested for alleged illegal entry into the controversial Yasukuni shrine before it was hit by a small explosion, local media reported. (Japan Today) Police in Yokohama said Monday they have arrested a 42-year-old man on suspicion of attempting to murder his 6-year-old son. (Japan Today)
Spending more money on public schools has long been the conventional way to try to improve student performance. Countries that allocate less than the average OECD expenditure expressed as a percentage of their gross domestic product are criticized for shortchanging students. But Japan and the United States illustrate that the preoccupation with spending is a distraction from a more fundamental issue. (Japan Times) Japanese macaque monkeys that bathe and relax in hot springs at the Jigokudani Yaen-Koen park in central Japan are drawing the attention of foreign travelers. (Jiji Press) The foreign ministers of South Korea and Japan on Monday reached a deal meant to resolve a decades-long impasse over Korean women forced into Japanese military-run brothels during World War II, an important breakthrough for the Northeast Asian powers. (Japan Today) Tokyo Metropolitan Police arrested a 24-year-old male company employee for smearing his own excrement on a girl in Mitaka City, reports TV Asahi (Dec. 27). (Tokyo Reporter) A teenager from Kimitsu, Chiba Prefecture, under arrest after allegedly killing his grandparents said he was ready to kill anyone but picked family members because someone else might run away, police said Monday. (Japan Times)


Article source: http://newsonjapan.com/html/newsdesk/article/114780.php

Comments (0)

Tags: ,

Prosecutors indict South Korean over Yasukuni shrine blast

Posted on 30 December 2015 by admin

Jeon Chang-Han, 27, was indicted for allegedly trespassing on the grounds of the Tokyo shrine in November, according to Jiji Press and other major media.

A suspected explosive device damaged a bathroom at the shrine on Nov 23.

No one was hurt, but the incident frayed nerves as Japanese authorities were strengthening security in the capital after the Paris attacks that killed 130.

Earlier media reports said police view Jeon as the prime suspect in the explosion.

He is believed to have initially left Japan but was arrested when he re-entered early this month, reportedly carrying two kilograms of gunpowder.

A woman was arrested Tuesday on suspicion of damaging a corpse and abandoning it after a human skull and body parts were found in a condominium in Osaka Prefecture. (Japan Times) Police are looking for the benevolent owner of 2,000 lottery tickets that were presumably left intentionally at the Tochigi City Hall in Ibaraki Prefecture. (Japan Today) For Mohammed, the perils of staying in Damascus crystalized when a sniper’s bullet whizzed past his head while he and his cousins were on his rooftop, watching the Syrian air force bomb rebel forces. (Japan Today) Japanese prosecutors on Monday charged a South Korean two weeks after he was arrested for alleged illegal entry into the controversial Yasukuni shrine before it was hit by a small explosion, local media reported. (Japan Today) Police in Yokohama said Monday they have arrested a 42-year-old man on suspicion of attempting to murder his 6-year-old son. (Japan Today)
Spending more money on public schools has long been the conventional way to try to improve student performance. Countries that allocate less than the average OECD expenditure expressed as a percentage of their gross domestic product are criticized for shortchanging students. But Japan and the United States illustrate that the preoccupation with spending is a distraction from a more fundamental issue. (Japan Times) Japanese macaque monkeys that bathe and relax in hot springs at the Jigokudani Yaen-Koen park in central Japan are drawing the attention of foreign travelers. (Jiji Press) The foreign ministers of South Korea and Japan on Monday reached a deal meant to resolve a decades-long impasse over Korean women forced into Japanese military-run brothels during World War II, an important breakthrough for the Northeast Asian powers. (Japan Today) Tokyo Metropolitan Police arrested a 24-year-old male company employee for smearing his own excrement on a girl in Mitaka City, reports TV Asahi (Dec. 27). (Tokyo Reporter) A teenager from Kimitsu, Chiba Prefecture, under arrest after allegedly killing his grandparents said he was ready to kill anyone but picked family members because someone else might run away, police said Monday. (Japan Times)


Article source: http://newsonjapan.com/html/newsdesk/article/114781.php

Comments (0)

Tags: ,

Japan, wary of outsiders, keeps doors closed to refugees

Posted on 30 December 2015 by admin

The same roof where Mohammed and his lifelong friend Jamal used to sit in a tent and play video games. Now, instead of studying for a law degree, Mohammed is working as a fitness instructor in Tokyo, trying to squeeze in some language study and hoping that like Jamal, he’ll beat the odds and win official status as a refugee in Japan.

The odds aren’t good.

Out of the 7,533 people who applied for refugee status in 2014, or appealed earlier refusals, only 11 were approved. That includes Jamal, his mother and sister, whose approvals came after a year-and-a-half wait.

For most, the approval never comes: In the past five years, the proportion of applicants granted refugee status in Japan has dropped to below 1 percent – in 2014 it was just 0.2 percent. In contrast, Germany has accepted nearly 40,000 Syrian asylum-seekers since񎧝, while the U.S. has pledged to accept 10,000 Syrian refugees and has resettled 2,234 since 2010.

Japan’s hands-off response to the global refugee crisis, despite its generous humanitarian aid, reflects deep unease over allowing in outsiders given the insular customs of this island nation. Despite growing concerns over a shrinking labor force, the government has so far resisted calls to open the door wider, both for humanitarian and economic reasons.

Immigration officials say they suspect many applicants of being job seekers, not true refugees fleeing persecution or conflict.

A woman was arrested Tuesday on suspicion of damaging a corpse and abandoning it after a human skull and body parts were found in a condominium in Osaka Prefecture. (Japan Times) Police are looking for the benevolent owner of 2,000 lottery tickets that were presumably left intentionally at the Tochigi City Hall in Ibaraki Prefecture. (Japan Today) For Mohammed, the perils of staying in Damascus crystalized when a sniper’s bullet whizzed past his head while he and his cousins were on his rooftop, watching the Syrian air force bomb rebel forces. (Japan Today) Japanese prosecutors on Monday charged a South Korean two weeks after he was arrested for alleged illegal entry into the controversial Yasukuni shrine before it was hit by a small explosion, local media reported. (Japan Today) Police in Yokohama said Monday they have arrested a 42-year-old man on suspicion of attempting to murder his 6-year-old son. (Japan Today)
Spending more money on public schools has long been the conventional way to try to improve student performance. Countries that allocate less than the average OECD expenditure expressed as a percentage of their gross domestic product are criticized for shortchanging students. But Japan and the United States illustrate that the preoccupation with spending is a distraction from a more fundamental issue. (Japan Times) Japanese macaque monkeys that bathe and relax in hot springs at the Jigokudani Yaen-Koen park in central Japan are drawing the attention of foreign travelers. (Jiji Press) The foreign ministers of South Korea and Japan on Monday reached a deal meant to resolve a decades-long impasse over Korean women forced into Japanese military-run brothels during World War II, an important breakthrough for the Northeast Asian powers. (Japan Today) Tokyo Metropolitan Police arrested a 24-year-old male company employee for smearing his own excrement on a girl in Mitaka City, reports TV Asahi (Dec. 27). (Tokyo Reporter) A teenager from Kimitsu, Chiba Prefecture, under arrest after allegedly killing his grandparents said he was ready to kill anyone but picked family members because someone else might run away, police said Monday. (Japan Times)


Article source: http://newsonjapan.com/html/newsdesk/article/114783.php

Comments (0)

Tags: ,

Search on for owner of 2,000 lottery tickets left at Tochigi City Hall

Posted on 30 December 2015 by admin

The tickets, placed in paper bags, were found inside the elevator of the administrative building’s parking lot at around noon on Monday by a woman. A handwritten note reading “If any of these tickets win a prize in the lottery, please use the money to help victims of storm disasters,” addressed to the Tochigi mayor, was also enclosed, Fuji TV reported.

The tickets, worth 600,000 yen, are for the famous year-end jumbo lottery draw. The top prize is 500 million yen.

A woman was arrested Tuesday on suspicion of damaging a corpse and abandoning it after a human skull and body parts were found in a condominium in Osaka Prefecture. (Japan Times) Police are looking for the benevolent owner of 2,000 lottery tickets that were presumably left intentionally at the Tochigi City Hall in Ibaraki Prefecture. (Japan Today) For Mohammed, the perils of staying in Damascus crystalized when a sniper’s bullet whizzed past his head while he and his cousins were on his rooftop, watching the Syrian air force bomb rebel forces. (Japan Today) Japanese prosecutors on Monday charged a South Korean two weeks after he was arrested for alleged illegal entry into the controversial Yasukuni shrine before it was hit by a small explosion, local media reported. (Japan Today) Police in Yokohama said Monday they have arrested a 42-year-old man on suspicion of attempting to murder his 6-year-old son. (Japan Today)
Spending more money on public schools has long been the conventional way to try to improve student performance. Countries that allocate less than the average OECD expenditure expressed as a percentage of their gross domestic product are criticized for shortchanging students. But Japan and the United States illustrate that the preoccupation with spending is a distraction from a more fundamental issue. (Japan Times) Japanese macaque monkeys that bathe and relax in hot springs at the Jigokudani Yaen-Koen park in central Japan are drawing the attention of foreign travelers. (Jiji Press) The foreign ministers of South Korea and Japan on Monday reached a deal meant to resolve a decades-long impasse over Korean women forced into Japanese military-run brothels during World War II, an important breakthrough for the Northeast Asian powers. (Japan Today) Tokyo Metropolitan Police arrested a 24-year-old male company employee for smearing his own excrement on a girl in Mitaka City, reports TV Asahi (Dec. 27). (Tokyo Reporter) A teenager from Kimitsu, Chiba Prefecture, under arrest after allegedly killing his grandparents said he was ready to kill anyone but picked family members because someone else might run away, police said Monday. (Japan Times)


Article source: http://newsonjapan.com/html/newsdesk/article/1񸳁.php

Comments (0)

Tags: ,

Osaka woman arrested after discovery of dismembered body

Posted on 30 December 2015 by admin

The suspect was identified as Terumi Morishima, 29, who described herself as illustrator and occupant of the condo in the city of Kadoma.

A 25-year-old female part-time worker in Kadoma who is an acquaintance of Morishima has been missing since last week, and the police believe the body parts are hers.

“A skull is in my room, but I don’t want to talk about it now,” Morishima was quoted as telling investigators during questioning.

A woman was arrested Tuesday on suspicion of damaging a corpse and abandoning it after a human skull and body parts were found in a condominium in Osaka Prefecture. (Japan Times) Police are looking for the benevolent owner of 2,000 lottery tickets that were presumably left intentionally at the Tochigi City Hall in Ibaraki Prefecture. (Japan Today) For Mohammed, the perils of staying in Damascus crystalized when a sniper’s bullet whizzed past his head while he and his cousins were on his rooftop, watching the Syrian air force bomb rebel forces. (Japan Today) Japanese prosecutors on Monday charged a South Korean two weeks after he was arrested for alleged illegal entry into the controversial Yasukuni shrine before it was hit by a small explosion, local media reported. (Japan Today) Police in Yokohama said Monday they have arrested a 42-year-old man on suspicion of attempting to murder his 6-year-old son. (Japan Today)
Spending more money on public schools has long been the conventional way to try to improve student performance. Countries that allocate less than the average OECD expenditure expressed as a percentage of their gross domestic product are criticized for shortchanging students. But Japan and the United States illustrate that the preoccupation with spending is a distraction from a more fundamental issue. (Japan Times) Japanese macaque monkeys that bathe and relax in hot springs at the Jigokudani Yaen-Koen park in central Japan are drawing the attention of foreign travelers. (Jiji Press) The foreign ministers of South Korea and Japan on Monday reached a deal meant to resolve a decades-long impasse over Korean women forced into Japanese military-run brothels during World War II, an important breakthrough for the Northeast Asian powers. (Japan Today) Tokyo Metropolitan Police arrested a 24-year-old male company employee for smearing his own excrement on a girl in Mitaka City, reports TV Asahi (Dec. 27). (Tokyo Reporter) A teenager from Kimitsu, Chiba Prefecture, under arrest after allegedly killing his grandparents said he was ready to kill anyone but picked family members because someone else might run away, police said Monday. (Japan Times)


Article source: http://newsonjapan.com/html/newsdesk/article/114786.php

Comments (0)

Advertise Here
Advertise Here